The Wall Street Journal

The Wall Street Journal is a business-focused, English-language international daily newspaper based in New York City. The Journal is published six days a week by Dow Jones & Company, a division of News Corp, along with its Asian and European editions. The Wall Street Journal is the largest newspaper in the United States by circulation. According to the Alliance for Audited Media, the Journal had a circulation of about 2.4 million copies (including nearly 900,000 digital subscriptions), as of March 2013, compared with USA Today‍ '​s 1.7 million. The Wall Street Journal has won 39 Pulitzer Prizes through 2015 and derives its name from Wall Street in the heart of the Financial District of Lower Manhattan. The Journal has been printed continuously since its inception on July 8, 1889, by Charles Dow, Edward Jones, and Charles Bergstresser.

"The war plan relies on raising troop levels from about 11,500 to about 15,000, deploying more air power against militants and moving military advisers back to the front line."

“Journalists wrongly portrayed the Tet Offensive as a U.S. defeat and never corrected the record.”

"Indicators being kept secret include size of Afghan army and police force and number of civilian airstrike casualties."

'The Trump administration is pressing Turkey and U.S.-backed Kurdish forces to pull back from a deepening military conflict in Syria."

“The military offensive is reminding Kurds how little global powers need them now that the fight against Islamic State is coming to an end.”

“Counterterrorism mission initiated after Duterte government requested aid during battle to oust insurgents from Marawi; improving ties.”