The Wall Street Journal

The Wall Street Journal is a business-focused, English-language international daily newspaper based in New York City. The Journal is published six days a week by Dow Jones & Company, a division of News Corp, along with its Asian and European editions. The Wall Street Journal is the largest newspaper in the United States by circulation. According to the Alliance for Audited Media, the Journal had a circulation of about 2.4 million copies (including nearly 900,000 digital subscriptions), as of March 2013, compared with USA Today‍ '​s 1.7 million. The Wall Street Journal has won 39 Pulitzer Prizes through 2015 and derives its name from Wall Street in the heart of the Financial District of Lower Manhattan. The Journal has been printed continuously since its inception on July 8, 1889, by Charles Dow, Edward Jones, and Charles Bergstresser.

“This July 4, Cadet Tom Surdyke was laid to rest alongside his brothers in the long gray line.”

"For Islamic State, this city was unlike any other: the birthplace of its movement and the first urban center it seized in a blitz that began the occupation of a third of Iraq."

"Regrettably, the human-rights groups were intransigent, and most of us in the military concluded that we shouldn’t spend scarce dollars on systems that would never be used."

“If you have not ever done so, I urge you to program into your next trip abroad a visit to an American military cemetery.”

“The ambush that killed Mullah Mansour marked a critical moment in Obama administration policy on Afghanistan.”

“The Afghan government is giving support to a Taliban faction in an effort to sow rifts within the insurgency and nudge some of its leaders toward peace talks.”