The Wall Street Journal

The Wall Street Journal is a business-focused, English-language international daily newspaper based in New York City. The Journal is published six days a week by Dow Jones & Company, a division of News Corp, along with its Asian and European editions. The Wall Street Journal is the largest newspaper in the United States by circulation. According to the Alliance for Audited Media, the Journal had a circulation of about 2.4 million copies (including nearly 900,000 digital subscriptions), as of March 2013, compared with USA Today‍ '​s 1.7 million. The Wall Street Journal has won 39 Pulitzer Prizes through 2015 and derives its name from Wall Street in the heart of the Financial District of Lower Manhattan. The Journal has been printed continuously since its inception on July 8, 1889, by Charles Dow, Edward Jones, and Charles Bergstresser.

"State Department specialists sent dissent cable urging more-intensive talks to end Afghanistan war."

"Kurdistan’s model should be Montenegro, which amicably separated from Serbia in 2006, rather than Kosovo."

"Insurgents infiltrated the city by pretending to be tribal fighters, security officials say."

“Reconciliation is possible, but the country will have to overcome at least five major challenges.”

"The contest for territory is playing out in Deir Ezzour, an oil-rich province where Islamic State has fought to protect its revenue streams."

“A year after losing its main Libyan stronghold, Islamic State has formed a number of clandestine cells around the chaotic North African country.”