El Centro is SWJ's focus on small wars in Latin America. The elephant in the hemispheric room is clearly the epidemic criminal, cartel and gang threat, fueled by a drug and migration economy, rising to the level of local and national criminal insurgencies and a significant U.S. national security risk. El Centro explores those and other issues across the US Southern Border Zone, Mexico, the Caribbean, Central and South America to develop a better understanding of the national and regional challenges underlying past, present, and future small wars.

El Centro presents relevant Small Wars Journal articles and SWJ Blog posts, and adds a preliminary reading list and research links of external works. We do link to some Spanish language resources but, for the moment, we are only operating in English. We look forward to being able to roll out El Centro, en Español, dentro de poco.

The El Centro Fellows are a group of professionals with expertise in and commitment to the region who support SWJ's approach to advancing our field and have generously agreed to join us in our El Centro endeavor. With their help and with continued development on our site's news and library sections, we look forward to providing more El Centro-relevant SWJ original material and more useful access to other important works and resources in the future.

The most recent SWJ articles & blog posts are listed below, more here.

Recent Items

"The current Mexican administration has underemphasized the need to develop a robust law enforcement strategy, focusing too narrowly on socioeconomic factors."

The Texas Department of Public Safety has released the updated Texas Gang Threat Assessment.

Transnational crime and its associated transnational illicit networks pose a challenge to sovereignty and governance by fostering corruption and impunity.

The “Hidden” Power of Illegally Armed Groups in Latin America: Mexico a Case Study

The first comprehensive report analyzing the current state of transnational criminal organizations in California and the threats they pose.

This essay is the first in a series exploring the issue of drug-related violence in Mexico.

“Because of asset shortfalls, we’re unable to get after 74 percent of suspected maritime drug smuggling.”

BACRIM in Colombia: Security Micro-Ecosystems and Violent Non-State Actor Fragmentation