The Wall Street Journal

The Wall Street Journal is a business-focused, English-language international daily newspaper based in New York City. The Journal is published six days a week by Dow Jones & Company, a division of News Corp, along with its Asian and European editions. The Wall Street Journal is the largest newspaper in the United States by circulation. According to the Alliance for Audited Media, the Journal had a circulation of about 2.4 million copies (including nearly 900,000 digital subscriptions), as of March 2013, compared with USA Today‍ '​s 1.7 million. The Wall Street Journal has won 39 Pulitzer Prizes through 2015 and derives its name from Wall Street in the heart of the Financial District of Lower Manhattan. The Journal has been printed continuously since its inception on July 8, 1889, by Charles Dow, Edward Jones, and Charles Bergstresser.

"Islamists in the Philippines pledged allegiance to ISIS, devastated a city and built a model for jihadists after the fall of Raqqa."

"Isnilon Hapilon and a fellow siege leader were killed in a battle to free Marawi from Isis-linked militants, officials say."

"Trump’s declaration comes as Baghdad government forces push into Kirkuk amid conflict with Kurds over disputed territory, threatening to disprupt fight against Islamic State."

"Elite Iraqi forces take control of local government building in Kirkuk."

"Kurdish security officials say Iraq wants to regain oil wells and installations in Kirkuk province."

"The theft, which hasn’t been disclosed, is considered by experts to be one of the most significant security breaches in recent years."