The Wall Street Journal

The Wall Street Journal is a business-focused, English-language international daily newspaper based in New York City. The Journal is published six days a week by Dow Jones & Company, a division of News Corp, along with its Asian and European editions. The Wall Street Journal is the largest newspaper in the United States by circulation. According to the Alliance for Audited Media, the Journal had a circulation of about 2.4 million copies (including nearly 900,000 digital subscriptions), as of March 2013, compared with USA Today‍ '​s 1.7 million. The Wall Street Journal has won 39 Pulitzer Prizes through 2015 and derives its name from Wall Street in the heart of the Financial District of Lower Manhattan. The Journal has been printed continuously since its inception on July 8, 1889, by Charles Dow, Edward Jones, and Charles Bergstresser.

“The rules of engagement mean that the indigenous Afghan and Pakistani Taliban generally get a pass.”

"As Islamic State loses territory in the grinding war in the Middle East, it is turning to less elaborate but lethal direct attacks on civilian targets."

“Call comes as the president outlines plans to send up to 250 more U.S. military personnel to Syria.”

"Defense Secretary Ash Carter has scrubbed a planned visit this month to Beijing amid rising tensions between the U.S. and China."

“In fighting terrorism, ‘building local capacity is one of the best weapons we have,’ the Secretary-General says.”

"Banks are closing the accounts of customers they fear may be up to no good, evicting from the financial system those the government most wants to watch."