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06/16/2021 News & Commentary – National Security

News & commentary by Dave Maxwell. Edited and published by Daniel Riggs

1.  Statement by President Joseph R. Biden, Jr. on the National Strategy for Countering Domestic Terrorism

2.  FACT SHEET: National Strategy for Countering Domestic Terrorism

3. Biden administration unveils new strategy to counter domestic terrorism

4. Memorandum for the Secretary of Defense on 2020 Unified Command Plan

5. FOLLOW-UP Comments Fixing Oversight of Special Operations Forces

6. How I learned to stop worrying and to love the Afghanistan withdrawal plan | Opinion

7. Biden nominates 9 to high-profile ambassador postings

8. Part 1: What the budget reveals — and leaves unclear — about the cost of JADC2

9. Part 2: Congress dealt ABMS a blow, but experts see progress

10. Part 3: Proposed modernization increases show Army sees joint operations as ‘top priority’

11. Part 4: Classified Navy JADC2 budget plan has a few spending hints

12. Biden’s Hair Should Be ‘On Fire’ Over Afghan Translators Being Left Behind, Senator Says

13. Pentagon considering permanent naval task force to counter China in the Pacific

14. Next National Defense Strategy Should Return to Two-War Force Construct

15. US military’s elite commando forces look to expand diversity

16. An alliance of democracies is essential

17. US signals flexibility and pragmatism to China

18. The real B3W-NATO agenda

19. How Biden Should Deal With Putin

20. China Repackages Its History in Support of Xi’s National Vision

21. Clausewitz and Centres of Gravity: Turning the Esoteric into Practical Outcomes

22. Developing a Combatant Command Campaign Plan: Lessons Learned at US Central Command

 

1. Statement by President Joseph R. Biden, Jr. on the National Strategy for Countering Domestic Terrorism

White House · June 15, 2021

Excerpt: "This is a project that should unite all Americans."

Statement by President Joseph R. Biden, Jr. on the National Strategy for Countering Domestic Terrorism

 

2. FACT SHEET: National Strategy for Countering Domestic Terrorism

White House · June 15, 2021

The 32 page strategy document can be downloaded here

The four pillars:

PILLAR 1: UNDERSTAND AND SHARE DOMESTIC TERRORISM-RELATED INFORMATION

PILLAR 2: PREVENT DOMESTIC TERRORISM RECRUITMENT AND MOBILIZATION TO VIOLENCE

PILLAR 3: DISRUPT AND DETER DOMESTIC TERRORISM ACTIVITY

PILLAR 4: CONFRONT LONG-TERM CONTRIBUTORS TO DOMESTIC TERRORISM

The 5th pillar should be: Do so without violating civil rights, the US Constitution, and American values.​

From the strategy: "while safeguarding bedrock American civil rights and civil liberties – values that​ ​make us who we are as a nation.​"​​

 

3. Biden administration unveils new strategy to counter domestic terrorism

NBC News · by Ken Dilanian · June 15, 2021

 

4. Memorandum for the Secretary of Defense on 2020 Unified Command Plan

White House · June 04, 2021

I missed this two weeks ago. Does this mean the Pentagon's global force posture review is complete and is it now time to update the UCP?  

I have received a number of comments to this article. They are all over the map.

First, my follow-up comment:

“Actually the more I think about this the more I think the article was a good idea. Note I said the article was a good idea. Changes to SOF will only come through Congressional action. Congress will not be at all happy with the proposal in the article as it will undo too much SOF goodness that has been developed since 1987, it will not fix the SOF issues, and will only create more. Therefore, perhaps this article will spur Congress to take another bold step forward (where are the 21st Century Nunn and Cohen?) and actually implement substantive SOF improvements beyond what they tried in Sec 922. Again, we do not need SOF as a separate service because there is a lot of goodness with the connections SOF elements have with their parent service and that was one of the smart aspects of Nunn-Cohen. But SOF needs the requisite service authorities and resources to properly manage and oversee SOF. This is what Congress must follow through with. They provided their intent with Sec 922 but only offered half measures and f steps to solve the problems. It is time for bold congressional action. Will it happen?

 

Comments received and observed:

1.

Barno makes a strong argument but history tells us that his suggested arrangement will diminish SO and SOF. His example of the Navy-Marine relationship is interesting but it is very different from a potential Army-SOF relationship. History!

I also find the fixation on SOF problems curious considering the very serious issues with conventional forces and their leaders. SOF certainly does need to clean up its messes. 

We also should not lose sight of the fact that our military, under predominantly conventional leaders, has proven to be incapable of winning wars against 4th rate opponents (I am categorizing Rangers as other direct action leaders in the conventionally, attrition-minded category). This includes the article’s author.

Contrary to Mulholland’s view, a separate service with global operational responsibilities is necessary. 

2. 

 

Tiring. You will note it is about the domains. The DA side of SOF is indeed more closely related to the Land. Special Warfare is a Human domain martial activity. 

3.

Well, how about them apples. 

Just maybe the discussion is getting down to the fundamentals of our strategic national security deficiency. Go under the Army’s civilian leadership (Navy -Marine) or acknowledge the emergence of a human domain and structure accordingly.

The millstone around our SOF neck is the inclusion of elite infantry into the community. We hue to our Army root out of nostalgia and romance. The Army then mandates subservience and corrupts in the process who we are and perverts in its control what we are meant to do.

4.

Dave,

You are exactly right. Placing SOF under the Army will particularly undo the SOF RD&A authority and the speed with which it is accomplished. Back to layers of slow moving oversight, unnecessary and ill informed and probably prejudiced challenges and denials. I served in USSOCOM from 1988-1994 in the early days and the ability to finally get things done for SOF by SOF which was extremely rewarding and satisfying. 

Placing SOF under the Army is a solution looking for a problem.  

5.

I think this a half measure. The Sec Army has a great deal on his plate and limited bandwidth with staff, time and resources. SOCOM and its forces are essentially the Marine Corps of SOF. Its forces are greatly dependent upon the respective Services largesse and it has a limited seat at the table. There is also the issue of Not Invented Here in regard to an Army Sec dictating to USAF, USN and USMC forces.

I think it best to do what Congress actually intended and give the ASD SOLIC near-Secretarial authority and an expanded staff to manage. He/She can focus exclusively on SOF and insure its interests are spoken for with equality/authority at the table. Most importantly, the position would direct resources without competition eg Do we support procurement of an exclusive Army item or fund a SOF initiative? etc.

 

Gen Barno's suggestion reduces the bureaucratic battle to keep SOF at bay, but it does not fix the inherant problem-The Services do not want SOF to have an equal voice or authorities regarding rice bowl issues.

My experience indicates that only a forced Congressional statute will resolve the issue. The Services will hate it but, in time, it will demonstrate the value as did Nunn-Cohen, Goldwater-Nichols and MFP 11.   

6.

the Army is barely able to direct the behavior and provide oversight of special operations forces wearing army uniforms. The idea the army secretary is going to provide oversight of units from other services is…let’s just say the idea is underdeveloped in this thin article. 

Sorta reads like Jake Blues wrote it to stop the mystery woman from killing him

7.

I hate to be the contrarian, but what Dave Barno and Nora Bensahel are proposing would be a creative and effective solution, particularly in the short run. One could even take it a step further and consider breaking up the ASD SOLIC and putting its various directorates under other ASDs within OUSD (P). At a minimum, DoD should fund a study to determine how effective it has been in terms of providing civilian oversight throughout its own history. With a constantly revolving door of political appointees it's tough to make an argument that they can oversee their own organization, let alone a Combatant Command. I'm not convinced throwing more money at the problem will solve their problems either. Last, if one assumes a status quo budget for the foreseeable future (best case), where are these additional funds going to come from? Thoughts, ctrarguments?

8.

I think there are several deep seated issues that mitigate against a half measure on this issue:

The Office of Sec Army is overwhelmed by just Army issues, asking them to supervise/manage SOF-especially other services will never work

The Services and the DOD bureaucracy absolutely hate the idea of SOF having a major voice at the table or authorities that detract from their own rice bowls. They will do everything in their power-civil service bureaucrats to political appointees to contain the authorities with every tool at their disposal-Recall all the Service Chiefs telling Congress post Grenada that everything was fine and only minor tweaking was necessary.

This proposal is an attempt to stall the direction of a strong ASD SO/LIC and hope the Hill buys it.

As with most reform/change within DOD, it takes legislative statutes to fix issues.

9.

Much like Trey Goudy said that the Squad is best preserved as a means to insure a GOP majority in the future..............

10.

What about putting them back under their respective services? Yes, there could be some standards for interoperability, but let them focus on Service missions.

We treat SOF as a strategic asset but that is only true in some very limited contexts. And it has contributed to where we are today. A lot of folks who grew up in SOF think only SOF can do certain things and restricted conventional forces as a consequence. This is particularly galling when those supposedly SOF capabilities are little more than basic combat tasks done by specialized troops. And SOF does not seize and hold terrain. At least not for very long.

 

11. FOLLOW-UP Comments Fixing Oversight of Special Operations Forces

warontherocks.com · by David Barno · June 15, 2021

So let’s place oversight for SOF with the service secretary facing the greatest challenge in articulating its role (and justifying its budgetary requirements) in the foreseeable future?

Seems like a high likelihood of a conflict of priorities, if not interests.

 

---------- Forwarded message ---------

From: David Maxwell <david.maxwell161@gmail.com>

Date: Tue, Jun 15, 2021 at 7:00 AM

Subject: Fixing Oversight of Special Operations Forces

To:

The authors have said the quiet part out loud.  There are many senior officials who likely support this and this will put us right back in 1986. The answer is not to give SOF oversight to the Army but it is to provide SOF with service authorities along with responsibilities (and the resources to execute them) as Congress intends. Rather than go back to the future and undo Nunn-Cohen of Goldwater-Nichols, SOF needs to continue to evolve to improve (to reach an enlightened state).

 

6. How I learned to stop worrying and to love the Afghanistan withdrawal plan | Opinion

Newsweek · by Frank Sobchak· June 11, 2021

Excerpts: “When thinking of our vital interests, the U.S. should focus on areas that matter to us strategically and the enemies that can threaten those interests. While we squandered our finances in Afghanistan, the forces of authoritarianism have been on the march. Russia and China present complicated global threats to the existing liberal order that the U.S spent decades building and maintaining. Iran, a nation that has pledged the destruction of both Israel and the United States, presents a regional threat to that order and is on the cusp of becoming a nuclear power—a grave danger that could ignite an arms race and further destabilize a crucial region. Afghanistan is a costly distraction from those much bigger threats.

Even if a vestige of the terrorist threat does rise again in Afghanistan, it is unlikely to be significant enough to require another large-scale, prolonged intervention. The vast majority of the current fighters are domestic combatants engaged in the struggle for Afghanistan's future. There are some al-Qaeda and Islamic State militants in Afghanistan, but those organizations spread across the world long ago in order to survive. It would require a willful suspension of reality to pretend the senior leaders of those organizations would return to set up terrorist training camps or operate overtly in Afghanistan, as this would put them in the crosshairs of American and coalition aircraft. If anything, it is the continued U.S. presence in Afghanistan that provides fodder for recruitment of the global jihadist network. Ending our involvement in the Afghan conflict will hurt the terrorists' recruitment efforts.

As John Quincy Adams once noted, we should not go abroad in search of monsters to destroy. The world is full of monsters who wish us ill. If we continuously go hunting for all of them, as we have for the last two decades, we will find ourselves financially insolvent and collectively exhausted. It is time for us to rest up and prepare, so that we will be ready when the big monsters do come for us.

 

7. Biden nominates 9 to high-profile ambassador postings

AP · by Aamer Madhani · June 15, 2021

 

8. Part 1: What the budget reveals — and leaves unclear — about the cost of JADC2

c4isrnet.com · by Nathan Strout · June 15, 2021

A four part series on JADC2 - Joint All-Domain Command and Control.

 

10. Part 3: Proposed modernization increases show Army sees joint operations as ‘top priority’

c4isrnet.com · by Andrew Eversden · June 15, 2021

 

11. Part 4: Classified Navy JADC2 budget plan has a few spending hints

c4isrnet.com · by Mark Pomerleau · June 15, 2021

 

12. Biden’s Hair Should Be ‘On Fire’ Over Afghan Translators Being Left Behind, Senator Says

defenseone.com · by Jacqueline Feldscher

 

13. Pentagon considering permanent naval task force to counter China in the Pacific

Politico

Excerpts: “It’s not yet clear whether the task force would involve only U.S. ships, or include other nations’ militaries as well, the people said.

Officials working on China policy at the Pentagon are also considering establishing a named military operation for the Pacific, which would create a formal planning process for the defense secretary and provide additional budget authority and resources for the effort, the people said.

The Pentagon has not yet briefed Capitol Hill on the plans, one of the people said.

Based on the work of Ratner’s task force, Austin issued a directive last week initiating several department-wide efforts to better address the security challenges posed by China as the United States’ “number one pacing challenge.” But officials declined to provide any details, saying that many of the initiatives are classified.

 

14. Next National Defense Strategy Should Return to Two-War Force Construct

airforcemag.com · by John A. Tirpak · June 15, 2021

There are only so many concepts: 2 Major Regional Contingencies and 2 lesser regional contingencies, Win-Hold-Win. We have probably seen them all since the ended of the Cold War.

The 60 page report can be downloaded here

 

15. US military’s elite commando forces look to expand diversity

militarytimes.com · by Lolita Baldor · June 15, 2021

Excerpts: “The effort comes as the military — and the nation — struggles with racism, extremism and hate crimes. Leaders see greater diversity as a way to combat extremism in the ranks, even as they increase other training and education programs.

Commando forces — particularly the officers — tend to be far less diverse than the military as a whole. While only a small percentage of those who try out eventually pass the grueling, years-long training for special operations, leaders hope that bringing in a wider array of recruits will lead to a more diverse force.

As of March 2021, a full 95% of all SEAL and combatant-craft crew (SWCC) officers were white and just 2% were Black, according to Naval Special Warfare statistics provided to the AP. The officers corps of Army Special Forces is 87% white, and also 2% Black.

The enlisted ranks are only slightly more diverse. About 84% of the Navy SEAL and SWCC enlisted troops are white, and 2% are Black. The greater diversity comes in the number of American Indian, Alaskan Native and those who say they are “multiple” races. The Army’s enlisted special forces are also 84% white, but the percentage of Blacks goes up to 4.

When all members of Naval Special Warfare and Army Special Operations Command are included — which would add combat support, civil affairs and psychological operations personnel — the diversity grows slightly. But it still doesn’t match the overall Army and Navy statistics. For example, 40% of the Navy’s enlisted force and 24% of it’s officers are non-white.

 

16. An alliance of democracies is essential

lowyinstitute.org · by Michael J Green

Excerpts:For years surveys have shown that thought-leaders across the Indo-Pacific greatly prefer democracy to authoritarianism. While the world’s leading democracies have rightly imposed sanctions in the cases of Xinjiang or Myanmar, the main theme of the recent Cornwall G7 Summit was about making the investments needed to demonstrate that democracy works. Thus, rather than pressuring countries to reject China’s Belt and Road projects, the United States, Australia and Japan (now joined by the other G7 countries) are offering high quality infrastructure financing alternatives.

But for that strategy to work, recipient countries will need to make borrowing decisions based on accountability, transparency and anti-corruption. A game of geopolitical influence absent efforts to strengthen democratic governance – even one backed by more lending – would end in failure as Beijing bribes its way across the region. It is only logical that the leading democracies should be coordinating strategies on this front. American and Australian taxpayers should demand no less.

Finally, solidarity among democracies matters to deterrence and regional stability. If Beijing or Moscow think that US alliances in Europe and Asia can be divided against each other, then the cost of aggression goes down. It does not require an explicit security guarantee for like-minded democracies to signal that there will be global consequences for coercion or aggression against vulnerable states even outside their own regions – the Quadrilateral Security Dialogue, or “Quad”, is one such example. In that regard the Cornwall G7 summit’s first ever mention of Taiwan also had real significance.

 

17. US signals flexibility and pragmatism to China

asiatimes.com · by MK Bhadrakumar · June 16, 2021

Huh? We were really trying to get the G7 to "slander" China?

Excerpts:Evidently, while a collective tone against China was possible at the G7, Washington failed to get the group to slander China. In sum, the final communiqué turned out to be a product dominated by the US with compromise by all.

All empirical evidence is stacked against a Western coordinated move, leave alone unified hostile action against China. The bottom line is that while European countries may have “systemic” differences with Beijing, their economic relations with China are competitive but they also have strategic needs for cooperation.

Interestingly, according to China Central Television, Blinken too acknowledged during his phone call with Yang on Friday on the eve of the Cornwall summit that the series of contacts between the US and China in the most recent weeks are beneficial to bilateral relations and the US is looking forward to increasing contact and exchanges with China at all levels.

Blinken reportedly said that the US adheres to the one-China principle and abides by the three China-US joint communiqués and hopes to maintain communication and coordination with China on major international and regional issues.

The G7 communiqué’s formulation on the Taiwan question confirms that the US wants to maintain flexibility in its handling of the China-US relationship. That is a very important indicator.

 

18. The real B3W-NATO agenda

asiatimes.com · by Pepe Escobar · June 16, 2021

Escobar provides quite an interpretation of B3W, the G7 and NATO summits,

Excerpts: The initial “catalytic investments” for BW3 were estimated at $100 billion. No one knows how these funds will be coming from the “development institutions.”

Seasoned Global South observers already bet they will be essentially provided by IMF/World Bank “green” loans tied to private sector investment in selected emerging markets, with an eye on profit.

The White House is adamant that “B3W will be global in scope, from Latin America and the Caribbean to Africa and the Indo-Pacific.” Note the blatant attempt to match Belt and Road’s reach.

All these “green” resources and new logistic chains, financed by what will be a variant of central banks showering helicopter money, would ultimately benefit G7 members – certainly not China.

And the “protector” of these new “green” geostrategic corridors will be – who else? – NATO. That’s the natural consequence of the “global reach” emphasized on the NATO 2030 agenda.

 

19. How Biden Should Deal With Putin

Foreign Affairs · by Michael McFaul · June 14, 2021

Conclusion:Biden is right to test whether Putin might embrace a more stable, predictable relationship with the United States. Should the Russian president opt instead to continue invading countries, mounting hacking and disinformation campaigns, and arresting innocent Russians and Americans, it will be clear that he, not Biden, is responsible for confrontation with the United States. Biden is also right to try to work with the Kremlin on a limited agenda of mutual interest, particularly on arms control. Even during tense moments of the Cold War, U.S. presidents saw the wisdom in cooperating with their Soviet counterparts to reduce the risk of nuclear war.

At the same time, the Biden administration must swiftly develop the other dimensions of its strategy for containing and deterring Putin’s belligerent behavior while also supporting democratic forces in Russia,

 

20. China Repackages Its History in Support of Xi’s National Vision

WSJ · by Chun Han Wong and Keith Zhai

It is easy to be reminded of George Orwell here:“Orwell believed that the status of history itself had been radically challenged by totalitarianism. In his essay Looking Back on the Spanish War, written in 1942, he recalled telling Arthur Koestler that: “History stopped in 1936.” By this he meant that the Spanish Civil War, as the first conflict of the totalitarian era, was the first time that rival propaganda machines made an accurate account of events impossible. “I know it is the fashion to say that most of recorded history is lies anyway,” he wrote. “I am willing to believe that history is for the most part inaccurate and biased, but what is peculiar to our own age is the abandonment of the idea that history could be truthfully written.”

Excerpts:​The history academy’s revisionism hasn’t always gone over well with the public. In December, its Weibo account drew wide criticism for an essay, since taken down, that challenged popular condemnation of Mao’s “Down to the Countryside Movement,” which forced millions of urban young people to live and work in rural villages.

The essay described the movement as “a great achievement that advanced the development of society,” according to copies that have been republished online. In that respect, it echoed official portrayals of the seven years Mr. Xi spent as a “rusticated youth” in the countryside as a transformative experience that taught him to serve the people.

Some Chinese historians say the academy is twisting history to serve politics. “They aren’t following an academic path,” said a prominent history professor in Beijing, who said he declined the academy’s invitation to collaborate on a project. “These people are doing this to suck up and win promotion.”

In April, Mr. Xi visited a memorial to a 1934 battle that took place during the “Long March,” a military retreat over thousands of miles by Communist Party troops that was later celebrated as a strategic triumph that helped Mao secure power. Mr. Xi urged his compatriots to emulate the undying faith and self-sacrifice shown by the Red Army.

When confronting challenges, domestic and foreign, in pursuit of China’s rejuvenation, he said, “We must have such conviction in our inevitable victory.”

 

21. Clausewitz and Centres of Gravity: Turning the Esoteric into Practical Outcomes

groundedcuriosity.com · by Michael G Krause · June 12, 2021

An admonishment that we must read Books Six and Eight of On War to begin to think about center of gravity. 

Conclusion: “I admire and am at the same time frustrated by Clausewitz: I like the genius he applies to a most difficult topic and yet am frustrated how difficult he is to penetrate sometimes. It is not a case of sorting the wheat from the chaff – his writing is so dense that every word has to be studied and thought about. It takes hard work; whole pages swim before my eyes sometimes. His work is poetry and seductively out of reach at times. If only he had lived long enough for one more read-through and tidy-up. Damn that cholera.

While many have not gone past the First Book in On War to discuss Clausewitz’s theories on war, strategy and states, the military professional interested in his work on Centre of Gravity has to wade through to Book Six and Book Eight before the ideas are mentioned. They form, however, a central idea to understand how forces generate strength. By understanding how forces generate strength one can understand the seeds of defeat in an enemy and protect one’s own. Planning is about understanding and understanding starts with the realm of the practical and the possible. By combining theory with practical understanding and the desire for practical outcomes, Clausewitz provides a useful and timeless start point for the modern military professional. Of course, he requires interpretation and judgement in application, but he makes one think and realise how much there is always still to learn.

 

22. Developing a Combatant Command Campaign Plan: Lessons Learned at US Central Command

mwi.usma.edu · by Chad Pillai · June 16, 2021

Theory does not always equal practice.

Some excellent advice in this piece including this conclusion: “Additionally, no matter how involved you are in the project, you should never take the product you worked on personally. If you do, you will face a lot of difficulty trying to defend everything you put into the CCP. I lived by the rule of thumb that I will be satisfied with the final product as long as the key concepts or ideas remain. Finally, while developing a CCP is a complex undertaking, gaining an appreciation for how the process works beyond what is taught will help future planners better navigate managing OPTs and develop products that are both useful and executable.

 

------------

 

"You can’t use up creativity. The more you use, the more you have." 

- Maya Angelou

 

"There are no traffic jams along the extra mile." 

- Roger Staubach

 

 "I have learned over the years that when one's mind is made up, this diminishes fear." 

- Rosa Parks

DanielRiggs Wed, 06/16/2021 - 9:00am
06/16/2021 News & Commentary – Korea

News & commentary by Dave Maxwell. Edited and published by Daniel Riggs

1. Both sanctions and diplomacy critical to denuclearizing N. Korea: Kritenbrink

2. N.K. leader opens key party meeting to discuss how to cope with 'current international situation'

3. North Korea Has Been Importing Chinese COVID-19 Vaccines Since Early May

4. A reunified Korea could be a formidable power in East Asia – Responsible Statecraft

5. Why is hunger getting worse in June? This is the worst in the Kim Jong-un era.

6.  Breaking News Inside N. Korea Soaring Food Prices Cause Market Confusion. 2.4 times the price of corn: "The market is screaming in pain.”

7. North Korea Has Been Importing Chinese COVID-19 Vaccines Since Early May

8. U.S. supports provision of COVID-19 vaccine to N. Korea

9. Police deployed at South Korea THAAD base as U.S. seeks upgrades

10. Kim warns of ‘tense’ food situation, longer COVID lockdown

11. Kritenbrink pledges efforts to strengthen alliance, denuclearize Korean Peninsula

12. Vice FM stresses human rights-based approach to new digital technologies

13. JCS chairman visits military units on western border island

14. NATO calls for ‘complete, verifiable, irreversible’ denuclearization of N. Korea

15. Ruling party chief proposes small modular reactors as energy aid to North Korea

16. North Korea's economic desperation

17. Korea’s ‘innotech’ economy maddens analog Japan

18. List of assets owned by Japan in Korea is ordered

19. North Korea’s Kim Jong-un isn’t a K-pop fan anymore

20. Ministry of State Security continues to conduct random arrests of illegal cell phone users near border

21. New research center formed to develop "personal security equipment" to protect Kim Jong Un during on-the-spot inspections

 

1. Both sanctions and diplomacy critical to denuclearizing N. Korea: Kritenbrink

en.yna.co.kr · by 변덕근 · June 16, 2021

Ambassador Kritenbrink has effectively outlined some of the key elements the Administration's Korean policy:

  • Denuclearization in accordance with all relevant UN Security Council Resolutions
  • Practical diplomacy and deterrence ( or as President Biden said "stern deterrence")
  • Enforcement of sanctions
  • An alliance approach

 

2. N.K. leader opens key party meeting to discuss how to cope with 'current international situation'

en.yna.co.kr · by 고병준 · June 16, 2021

Again, does the "current international situation" mean that Kim is laying the groundwork and preparing the narrative to support Kim's "externalization" of his domestic problems? Are we going to see increased tensions, threats, and possible provocations?

 

3. North Korea Has Been Importing Chinese COVID-19 Vaccines Since Early May

rfa.org · by Hyemin Son, Jeongeun Ji and Myungchul Lee

An interesting development.

 

4. A reunified Korea could be a formidable power in East Asia – Responsible Statecraft

responsiblestatecraft.org · by Christopher Mott · June 15, 2021

The author does not share with us the paths to unification. What is the path" Reconciliation and merging to systems? A new nK leadership that seeks unification? War? Regime instability and collapse?

Frankly, the author does not seem to present an understanding of the nature, objectives, and strategy of the Kim family regime and embarks magical mystery tour to get to unification.

While I agree unification will make Korea formidable it has to be a United Republic of Korea (UROK) The solution to all the problems on the Korean peninsula is to achieve the only acceptable durable political arrangement: A secure, stable, economically vibrant, non-nuclear Korean peninsula unified under a liberal constitutional form of government with respect for individual liberty, the rule of law, and human rights, determined by the Korean people. In short, a United Republic of Korea (UROK).

But I think the essence or the basic intent of this article is to provide supporting fires to the position that there should be an end of war declaration. He wants to make it seem that if there is an end of war and denuclearzation we can then proceed down the path of unification that will result in a Switzerland like unification Korea (perhaps with a small amount of nuclear weapons).

Not only is this fantasy it requires appeasement of the Kim family regime and we should know where that will take us.

 

5. Why is hunger getting worse in June? This is the worst in the Kim Jong-un era.

asiapress.org

Reporting from inside north Korea. More indicators that we must pay attention to observe for potential instability.

 

6. Breaking News Inside N. Korea Soaring Food Prices Cause Market Confusion. 2.4 times the price of corn: "The market is screaming in pain.”

asiapress.org

More reporting and indicators from north Korea.

 

7. North Korea Has Been Importing Chinese COVID-19 Vaccines Since Early May

rfa.org · by Hyemin Son, Jeongeun Ji and Myungchul Lee

An interesting development.

 

8. U.S. supports provision of COVID-19 vaccine to N. Korea

en.yna.co.kr · by 변덕근 · June 15, 2021

 

9.  Police deployed at South Korea THAAD base as U.S. seeks upgrades

UPI · by Elizabeth Shim · June 16, 2021

The ROK government has been unable to separate the professional agitators from the local population.

This problem will persist as long as these professional agitators are allowed to conduct their subversive activities (which consists of duping the local population).

 

10. Kim warns of ‘tense’ food situation, longer COVID lockdown

AP News · by Kim Tong-Hyung · June 16, 2021

And to continue to beat the dead horse: the suffering is caused by Ki Jong-un’s deliberate policy decisions to prioritize nuclear and missile development, military modernization, and support to the elite over the welfare of the Korean people living in the north.

We can expect the regime to exploit the suffering as rationale for demands for sanctions relief. Paradoxically Kim knows we are more concerned with the welfare of the Korean people living in the north than he is. He will try to play on our humanitarian nature as part of his political warfare strategy.

 

11. Kritenbrink pledges efforts to strengthen alliance, denuclearize Korean Peninsula

en.yna.co.kr · by 변덕근 · June 15, 2021

There should be no doubt that the Biden administration prioritizes alliance as a main effort in our foreign policy.

 

12. Vice FM stresses human rights-based approach to new digital technologies

en.yna.co.kr · by 송상호 · June 16, 2021

No mention of north Korea? Why not? Think of what digital technologies would do for the Korean people in the north. South Korea should be leading the change to make the regime open up north Korea 'digitally." To follow the Vice FM's arguments the Korean people in the north have a right to digital access.

 

13. JCS chairman visits military units on western border island

en.yna.co.kr · by 오석민 · June 16, 2021

This is the traditional period for the "crab wars" of north-South confrontation in the West Sea.

 

14. NATO calls for ‘complete, verifiable, irreversible’ denuclearization of N. Korea

donga.com · June 15, 2021

I cannot recall any past NATO statements that include north Korea. The Biden administration has done a good job marshalling the international community to address Korean security issues.

 

15.  Ruling party chief proposes small modular reactors as energy aid to North Korea

The Korea Times · June 16, 2021

Is this a new variation on the 1994 Agreed Framework? Do we think this will entice Kim Jong-un?

 

16. North Korea's economic desperation

The Korea Times · by Sandip Kumar Mishra  · June 16, 2021

The responsibility for all suffering lies on Kim's shoulders.

Key point: “It is important to underscore that the economic performance of North Korea will have significant bearings on its strategic choices. The new U.S. administration of President Joe Biden has been in the process of unveiling its North Korea policy, and the moribund North Korean economy will restrict Kim Jong-un's negotiating positions.

 

17. Korea’s ‘innotech’ economy maddens analog Japan

asiatimes.com · by William Pesek · June 16, 2021

Excerpts: “Winnie Tang at the University of Hong Kong notes that the pivotal role of Pangyo Techno Valley, Korea’s answer to Silicon Valley, in morphing the nation into an “innotech” hub – a combination of innovation and technology development – deserves more attention.

First, she argues, Korea rebounded from the 1997-98 Asian financial crisis faster than its peers. Over the next two decades, Tang argues, GDP per capita doubled, K-Pop and Korea’s innotech “gained global renown,” while sectors from cosmetics to home appliances to mobile phones to food to clothing to automobiles made the nation a top player in global trade.

Now, though, things are going full circle, as innovative energy spreads far and wide afield of Pangyo Techno Valley sitting 21 kilometers from Seoul. Japan, by comparison, spent most of the last eight years obsessing over hosting the Tokyo Olympics, not relocating and reviving the economic mojo on display in 1964.

The worst news for Japan in the World Bank’s latest Ease of Doing Business index is not that Tokyo came in 24 places behind Seoul. It’s that at 29th Japan lags Russia, Kazakhstan, Thailand and Mauritius. In 2013, by the way, Japan was 24th. Since then, Korea has only enhanced its reputation as an economy on the move as Japan walks in place and falls further behind.

 

18. List of assets owned by Japan in Korea is ordered

koreajoongangdaily.joins.com· by Sarah Kim · June 16, 2021

I imagine this will upset Japan.

 

19. North Korea’s Kim Jong-un isn’t a K-pop fan anymore

koreajoongangdaily.joins.com· by Sarah Kim and Jeong Yong-Soo · June 16, 2021

Who does Kim fear more: the US or the Korean people? This is another indicator that he fears the Korean people more.

Excerpts:  “The war against K-pop has spread since the collapse of a second summit between Kim and U.S. President Donald Trump in Hanoi, Vietnam, in February 2019

 Last December, North Korea enacted a new law that called for up to 15 years in labor camps for people who watch or possess South Korean entertainment, according to Seoul lawmakers briefed by government intelligence officials.

 "The phenomenon of capitalist culture spreading among North Korean youth has been around for a long time,” said Jeon Young-sun, a unification studies professor at Konkuk University. “North Korea's leadership is aware of it, but when there is a difficult external environment, there are more efforts to crack down on it in order to strengthen internal solidarity.”

 

20. Ministry of State Security continues to conduct random arrests of illegal cell phone users near border

dailynk.com · by Ha Yoon Ah · June 16, 2021

External information is an existential threat to the regime.

 

21. New research center formed to develop "personal security equipment" to protect Kim Jong Un during on-the-spot inspections

dailynk.com · June 16, 2021

Kim is afraid of the Korean people.

 

-----------

 

"You can’t use up creativity. The more you use, the more you have." 

- Maya Angelou

 

"There are no traffic jams along the extra mile." 

- Roger Staubach

 

 "I have learned over the years that when one's mind is made up, this diminishes fear." 

- Rosa Parks

DanielRiggs Wed, 06/16/2021 - 8:32am
06/15/2021 News & Commentary – National Security

News & commentary by Dave Maxwell. Edited and published by Daniel Riggs

1. Biden Administration Foreign Policy Tracker: Early June

2. Leaving Afghan Allies Behind: Abandoning translators to the Taliban is a moral and strategic mistake.

3. Taiwan says will be ‘force for good’ after unprecedented G7 support

4. Win or Lose, U.S. War Against China or Russia Won’t Be Short

5. Top military officer says U.S. capable of defending Taiwan

6. Fixing Oversight of Special Operations Forces

7. An Alternative to the Afghan Pullout By James Inhofe

8. We Ignore the Human Domain at Our Own Peril

9. Sending in the Troops: The Kerner Report, Civil Unrest, and the US Military

10. The Anti-Quad, The PRIC and The Clash of Values

11. Opinion | We Cannot Afford to Turn Our Backs on Afghanistan

12. F-35 pilot: Forget drones, the skies still belong to fighter pilots

13. G7 more divided than united on countering China

14. Shifting Focus, NATO Views China as a Global Security Challenge

15. Disagreements flare among NATO allies despite relief at Biden’s arrival

16. The enduring triumph of Chimerica

17. Air Force would contribute bulk of new cyber mission force teams

18. FBI warns lawmakers that QAnon 'digital soldiers' may become more violent

19. Biden’s Kinder, Gentler Trumpism

20. China hits back at ‘slanderous’ Nato claim it poses threat to west

21. Saving America From the Counterrevolution

22. Is China Backtracking On Its Wolf Warrior Diplomatic Style?

 

1. Biden Administration Foreign Policy Tracker: Early June

June 14, 2021 | FDD Tracker: June 4 – 14, 2021

FDD Biden Administration Foreign Policy Tracker: Early June

David Adesnik

Welcome back to the Biden Administration Foreign Policy Tracker, where FDD’s experts and scholars assess the administration’s foreign policy every two weeks. As always, they provide trendlines of very positive, positive, neutral, negative, or very negative for the areas they study. With President Joe Biden on his first overseas trip, foreign policy has taken center stage. At the G7 summit in the United Kingdom, Biden announced the United States will purchase and donate half a billion doses of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine to low-income nations, “with no strings attached.” Today the president is in Brussels for his first NATO summit, while the Taliban surges across Afghanistan. On the gathering’s sidelines, Biden will have his first in-person meeting with his Turkish counterpart, whose conduct consistently undermines the transatlantic alliance. The sternest test for Biden will come on Wednesday when he meets Russian President Vladimir Putin in Geneva. Will Putin dial back his provocations after the summit, or will he only emerge emboldened? Check back in two weeks to see if Biden capitalized on these opportunities.

 

2. Leaving Afghan Allies Behind: Abandoning translators to the Taliban is a moral and strategic mistake.

WSJ · by the Editorial Board · June 14, 2021

Excerpts: “Even a functioning visa program is insufficient at this point. President Biden can save lives by doing more, such as the evacuation of applicants to a temporary third country as the process plays out. Or he could provide them with humanitarian parole, which grants temporary permission to enter the U.S.

The Afghan translators risked their lives helping the U.S.—following the rules and earning a chance at the American dream. Abandoning them now is unconscionable.

 

3. Taiwan says will be ‘force for good’ after unprecedented G7 support

Reuters 

Excerpts: “Taiwan will continue to deepen its partnership with G7 states and other like-minded countries and strive for greater support from the international community, he said.

Taiwan will also "firmly contribute the greatest force for good" for peace, stability, and prosperity in the Indo-Pacific region, Chang added.

China has stepped up its pressure against democratically-run Taiwan in recent months, with regular military drills near the island as it tries to assert Beijing's sovereignty.

While most countries, including G7 members, have no formal diplomatic ties with Taiwan, the grouping along with other Western allies have been bolstering their backing for the island.

That includes calling for Taiwan to be given proper access to the World Health Organization during the coronavirus pandemic. Taiwan is not a member due to Chinese objections, which considers it merely one of its provinces with no right to the trappings of a state.

 

4. Win or Lose, U.S. War Against China or Russia Won’t Be Short

Bloomberg · by Hal Brands · June 14, 2021

Nor would one be short with north Korea, Iran, or Russia. And the subtitle is an important question: what comes next? 

Conclusion: It doesn’t take much skill or foresight to start a big war. It may take a lot of endurance and creativity to end a great-power conflict somewhere short of disaster.

 

5. Top military officer says U.S. capable of defending Taiwan

Focus Taiwan ·  by David Barno · June 12, 2021

I have not seen this in the US press but I am not surprised that the Taiwan media noticed his testimony. 

 

6. Fixing Oversight of Special Operations Forces

warontherocks.com · by David Barno · June 15, 2021

The authors have said the quiet part out loud.  There are many senior officials who likely support this and this will put us right back in 1986. The answer is not to give SOF oversight to the Army but it is to provide SOF with service authorities along with responsibilities (and the resources to execute them) as Congress intends. Rather than go back to the future and undo Nunn-Cohen of Goldwater-Nichols, SOF needs to continue to evolve to improve (to reach an enlightened state).

 

7. An Alternative to the Afghan Pullout By James Inhofe

WSJ · by James Inhofe · June 13, 2021

Excerpts: “Preventing terrorist attacks from coming to American shores is why we have troops in Syria, Iraq and Somalia. Maintaining peace and preventing aggression is why we’ve had troops in Kosovo for more than two decades, on the Sinai Peninsula in Egypt for almost five decades and in South Korea for more than seven decades. It is also why our troops are standing sentry in Europe and the Indo-Pacific today.

Two years ago, a bipartisan majority of the Senate warned President Trump against removing all U.S. troops from Afghanistan without establishing the proper conditions on the ground. Mr. Trump listened. Mr. Biden didn’t. Reconsidering pivotal decisions is a sign of wisdom, not weakness, and I urge Mr. Biden to reconsider his choice on Afghanistan.

 

8. We Ignore the Human Domain at Our Own Peril

mwi.usma.edu · by Austin Branch · June 14, 2021

It is good to see LTG Cleveland credited with the human domain which I think has long been overlooked or forgotten.

Excerpts:Below are a series of recommended actions to improve the US government’s human domain capabilities and prowess in the context of great power competition.

Leadership and Accountability

Better Integration of Social and Behavioral Sciences Across the Defense Enterprise

Human Feedback Loops are Essential

Change the Way We Train and Exercise for the Human Domain

Learn to Leverage the Space

Take a Hard Look at Authorities

Build a Nimble and Proactive Force

The human domain problem is more than academic—the domain is where great power competition is playing out, and in ways that seem both familiar and unprecedented. Indeed, most engagements are now won or lost in the competition phase—before conflict, much less kinetic activity, are even in play. Importantly, the defense enterprise is unprepared for persistent engagement in the human domain. Moreover, since the current competition space does not include a large-scale kinetic conflict, conventional capabilities are not an effective deterrent or response to adversary operations in the information environment. To secure our democracy against authoritarian adversaries who currently operate freely within the human domain, the United States must embrace the new information paradigm and begin to orient capabilities toward developing agile processes and tactics to effectively operate in a contested and uncertain environment. Ultimately, we need to remember that the secret to getting ahead is to get started.

 

9. Sending in the Troops: The Kerner Report, Civil Unrest, and the US Military

mwi.usma.edu · by Laura Keenan · June 15, 2021

Conclusion: “The precedent of how the National Guard handled previous unrest is not a prescription for the future but offers essential reference points. The National Guard can add to or minimize the chaos, and the level at which the National Guard prepares in advance likely determines the role it plays. The lessons on inequality and police brutality learned from the Kerner Report are still timely, and understanding the root cause of unrest can accelerate the National Guard’s response. The National Guard’s role in civil unrest missions is vital to national security. The National Guard’s readiness for civil unrest reduces the potential strain for the active-duty military. It also sends a clear national security message to adversaries that even in moments of domestic crisis, the National Guard is prepared to provide a ready and resilient force to secure the homeland.“

 

10. The Anti-Quad, The PRIC and The Clash of Values

boloji.com

Yes this new acronym for authoritarian regimes should really catch on (note sarcasm). Pakistan, Russia, Iran, China. Form the acronym and say it out loud. I guess the author had to substitute Pakistan for north Korea since it might form a useful acronym.

Conclusion: “Since the acronym BRIC was coined conceptually by the Goldman Sachs global economist James O’Neil in 2001, BRIC actually emerged in real in 2009 followed by the BRICS in 2011. There are internal contradictions in the BRICS grouping but it is still relevant. The fact of the matter is that the economic grouping emerged eight years after the acronym was coined and conceptualized. We see a parallel here. An Anti-Quad grouping is taking shape and form in a strategic counter-reaction to the reincarnation of Quad 3.0 as an alliance of democracies. This Anti-Quad is an alliance of authoritarians and its raison d’etre is the Quad 3.0. We witness a serious clash of values, democratic versus authoritarian, between the Quad and the Anti-Quad. Whether this grouping will actually take a concrete shape in the form of an alliance is yet to be seen. The four countries that constitute this Anti-Quad are Russia, China, Pakistan and Iran. In the now famous tradition of BRIC, for conceptual clarity, we coin a new acronym PRIC that denotes the four authoritarian nations. The PRIC is an acronym for Pakistan, Russia, Iran and China depicting a de facto emerging strategic alliance of authoritarian regimes as a counter reaction to the Quad 3.0. There is a visible clash of values, democracy versus autocracy! The PRIC represents the autocrats of the world who are resisting democratic values world-wide.

 

11. Opinion | We Cannot Afford to Turn Our Backs on Afghanistan

The New York Times · by Robert M. Gates · June 13, 2021

Conclusion: The outcome in Afghanistan still matters in terms of American interests. We turned our backs on Afghanistan after Soviet troops withdrew in 1989; we must not do so again after the last of our troops depart. We must assure the Afghans of our continuing support — and sustain that support — through every means available short of ground troops. The consequences of another Taliban takeover in Kabul would not be limited to the people of Afghanistan.

 

12. F-35 pilot: Forget drones, the skies still belong to fighter pilots

sandboxx.us · by Hasard Lee · June 14, 2021

Excerpt: “As a fighter pilot, my job is to not fall in love with the aircraft I fly, but to use it as a tool to accomplish a mission. We are constantly looking for ways to optimize our lethality while minimizing risk. If there is a better way to accomplish a mission, then it is our duty to use it. While I agree with Elon Musk that the future is drone warfare, I think we’re a lifetime away from seeing a fully autonomous Air Force.”

 

13. G7 more divided than united on countering China

asiatimes.com · by Andrew Salmon · June 14, 2021

I am not so sure. Every joint statement or communique is a compromise document. It may seem weak to some but I think it was a pretty strong statement because the community of democracies was able to compromise to reach it. There had been questions prior to the summit whether they would address China at all so this would seem to have been beyond expectations.

 

14. Shifting Focus, NATO Views China as a Global Security Challenge

The New York Times · by Steven Erlanger and Michael D. Shear · June 14, 2021

Excerpts:Some NATO members, especially those nearest to Russia in Central and Eastern Europe and the Baltic nations, are anxious that the shift in focus to China does not divert resources and attention from the Russian threat.

President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia with Chinese and Russian military officials during joint military exercises in Siberia in 2018.Credit...Pool photo by Alexei Nikolsky

Mr. Biden made a point of meeting the leaders of Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland in Brussels before his meeting with Mr. Putin. NATO troops are deployed in all four countries.

But even Britain, probably Washington’s closest ally, expressed some wariness about confrontation with China. Asked at the NATO meeting about China, Prime Minister Boris Johnson warned against a “new Cold War,” while acknowledging that China’s rise was a “gigantic fact in our lives.”

Similarly, Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany said after the meeting: “If you look at the cyberthreats and the hybrid threats, if you look at the cooperation between Russia and China, you cannot simply ignore China.’’ But she also said: “One must not overrate it, either — we need to find the right balance.”

 

15. Disagreements flare among NATO allies despite relief at Biden’s arrival

The Washington Post · June 14, 2021

Excerpts: ““China is increasing its expansion, its influence around the world, and it’s increasingly running up against NATO,” Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Monday at a forum organized by the German Marshall Fund that ran alongside the summit. “We need to make sure that as an alliance, even though we’re much more Atlantic than Pacific, we are aware of the global influences the Chinese have.”

But not every NATO country is on board with confronting China more forcefully. Some such as Hungary have friendly relations with China and seek investments from Beijing. Others such as Germany and other big European powers fall in the middle, believing there is a balance between the need to work with Beijing to fight climate change and the need to rein in its global ambitions.

At the G-7 summit, too, the question of how vigorously to call out China remained a point of division, with Germany, Italy and Japan expressing some reluctance to go as far as the Biden administration hoped.

And NATO’s front-line countries, the ones that border Russia, have been concerned in the past that focusing elsewhere could distract from what they see as the alliance’s central mission of defending against Russia, although many are increasingly coming around to the necessity of responding to both.

 

16. The enduring triumph of Chimerica

asiatimes.com · by David P. Goldman · June 14, 2021

Excerpts: “I would be surprised to learn that the US Treasury and the PBOC have worked this out in some kind of tacit policy agreement. The current is so strong that the US is being caught up in a Sinocentric vortex of trade and capital flows whether it likes it or not.

Eventually, US-China policy will adjust to the misery of America’s present circumstances.

 

17.  Air Force would contribute bulk of new cyber mission force teams

Defense News · by Mark Pomerleau · June 14, 2021

 

18. FBI warns lawmakers that QAnon 'digital soldiers' may become more violent

CNN · by Zachary Cohen and Whitney Wild

 

19. Biden’s Kinder, Gentler Trumpism

Bloomberg · by Karl W. Smith · June 14, 2021

Excerpts: “No issue was more fundamental to Trump’s break with the past than his view of China as a rival rather than a partner. Not only were there the constant rhetorical attacks, but there was an often overlooked admission in a 2019 speech that he had always intended to spend the economic dividends from his tax cut on a trade war with China, but that it was worth the price.

Biden has been more restrained. But his advisers have made it clear there will be no return to the Obama-era paradigm of engagement, some of which those same advisers had worked to foster.

Crucially, the Biden administration has coupled this objective with the goal of broadly shared prosperity and declining inequality. This is the keystone that Trump, with his base in the Republican Party, simply could not set in place.

Ideologically, Trump’s policies of tax cuts for multinational corporations and “Buy American” provisions weren’t very compatible. With his supply-chain initiative, however, Biden is taking a crucial step forward in defining an economic paradigm that puts neoliberalism in the rear-view mirror. Whether the shift is wise is doubtful. But there can be little doubt that it is upon us.

 

20. China hits back at ‘slanderous’ Nato claim it poses threat to west

The Guardian · by Helen Davidson · June 15, 2021

Excerpts: “China’s embassy in London said it was resolutely opposed to mentions of Xinjiang, Hong Kong and Taiwan, which it said distorted the facts and exposed the “sinister intentions of a few countries such as the United States”.

China is under increasing pressure over its human rights abuses against ethnic minorities in Xinjiang and other regions, a draconian intervention in Hong Kong’s semi-autonomy, and threats towards Taiwan, which it considers a breakaway province to be reclaimed, by force if necessary.

The G7 had called on China to “respect human rights and fundamental freedoms, especially in relation to Xinjiang and those rights, freedoms and high degree of autonomy for Hong Kong enshrined in the Sino-British Joint Declaration and the Basic Law”. It also underscored “the importance of peace and stability across the Taiwan Strait”, and said it encouraged “the peaceful resolution of cross-Strait issues”.

 

21. Saving America From the Counterrevolution

aier.org · by Ethan Yang · June 14, 2021

Some interesting food for thought.

Excerpts: “The founder of the American Institute for Economic Research (AIER), Colonel Edward C. Harwood, wrote a little-known manifesto titled The Counterrevolution, which recounts this lesson not just for America but for the entirety of Western Civilization and its allies. The book may have been written in 1951, but it is just as relevant today, if not more so given where we are. During Harwood’s time, he saw a world greatly coming undone. Communism and Fascism were on the rise in Europe. Here at home, he observed a much milder but still highly troubling embrace of authoritarianism and reckless economics. It was obvious after reading Harwood’s book that he founded AIER to be the vanguard of not only sound economics and good government but ultimately a free and open society.

...

The socialists are very much still around today and their influence is growing. There is also the far-right and the new-right that seem to have abandoned the traditional Conservative commitment to the Constitution as well as free markets. On the left, you have the aforementioned socialists but also the emergence of intersectionality and critical race theory that combine economic ignorance with an utter disregard for individual dignity. Harwood explains that counterrevolutionary ideologies are based on legitimate complaints about society but have terrible solutions.

The best way to deal with them is to eliminate the problems that give them strength, whether it be providing economic opportunities for the marginalized or ensuring communities that were left behind can modernize. This, of course, requires more economic and civil freedom, not less. Harwood would recommend beating back the regulatory state, restoring the constitutional order, continuing to foster inclusive values pertaining to individuality, and reinvigorating our faith in private enterprise. They helped Western Civilization get this far; embracing these ideas again will certainly take it farther.

...

Defenders of the great revolution of enlightenment values and modernity have our work cut out for us. Harwood’s book is just as relevant today as it was in 1951 and at less than 100 pages, it is a manifesto for those who are up to the task of standing watch over the well-being of our society. Those who wish to dismantle the institutions of liberty that have made the West and its affiliates the richest and most advanced in human history pose a real threat. Abroad they must be held back with bayonets and sound foreign policy. Domestically they must be defeated in the realm of ideas and thoroughly discredited by addressing our shortcomings that give them credibility. Ultimately, this all requires restoring confidence in our civilization. That is because long before any rival power declares victory over the West, the West will have already given up on itself.

 

22. Is China Backtracking On Its Wolf Warrior Diplomatic Style?

eurasiareview.com · by Harsh V. Pant · June 15, 2021

Excerpt: “But beyond the style, what is key is action. And here it is highly unlikely that CCP will give up its regional and global aspirations, which have resulted in an aggressive foreign policy posture. Even if Chinese diplomats tone down their rhetoric, Beijing’s expansive foreign policy ambitions will continue to bring it into confrontation with its neighbours and other major powers.

Reflecting on his engagement with China, Henry Kissinger, the former US secretary of state, wrote that “Beijing’s diplomacy was so subtle and indirect that it largely went over our heads in Washington.” None of that subtlety exists today as China redefines its global role and agenda. While the Chinese leadership may now be realising that its diplomatic style needs a revamp, there is no indication that there is a rethink on Chinese policies. Stylistic shift without a substantive rethink won’t lead to a significant change in perceptions. But what recent developments underscore is that the costs are rising for China when it comes to its bullying tactics and for all the talk, there is hardly any plan to deal with it.

 

----------------

 

“Grand strategy is about marrying ends to means, about doing what you can, consistent with the nation's capabilities and resources.”

- Robert D. Kaplan, Earning the Rockies: How Geography Shapes America's Role in the World

 

"Every revolution has its counterrevolution that is a sign the revolution is for real. And every revolution must defend itself against this counterrevolution, or the revolution will fail."

- C. Wright Mills,  Listen Yankee (1960), pp. 54.

 

"A boxer derives the greatest advantage from his sparring partner – and my accuser is my sparring partner. He trains me in patience, civility and even temper."

- Marcus Aurelius 

DanielRiggs Tue, 06/15/2021 - 9:49am
06/15/2021 News & Commentary – Korea

News & commentary by Dave Maxwell. Edited and published by Daniel Riggs

1. Biden Administration Foreign Policy Tracker: Early June (Korea)

2. Remarks by President Moon Jae-in Leaving Cornwall after G7 Summit

3. North Korean defector says 'even North Korea was not this nuts' after attending Ivy League school

4. Unification minister puts U.S. trip on hold amid uncertainty over inter-Korean relations

5. Minister vows efforts to resume stalled talks with N. Korea on summit anniv.

6. How can Korea make the best of the G7 summit?

7. Border to get robot cameras, AI monitoring (Korea)

8. Entire border patrol unit in North Hamgyong Province placed into quarantine following "paratyphoid" outbreak

9. Why Does the Gov't Disregard Veterans? (South Korea)

10. Japan nixed meeting between Suga, Moon at G7

11. South Korea-Japan ties sour amid fresh military drills near disputed islands

12. North Korea: Why the Kingdom of Kim Jong Un Can Never Be Normal

 

1. Biden Administration Foreign Policy Tracker: Early June (Korea)

FDD  · Korea: David Maxwell and Mathew Ha

Previous Trend: Positive

The positive effects of the summit between President Biden and South Korean President Moon Jae-in are still being felt. The two leaders’ mutual commitment to protecting the rules-based international order led China to warn South Korea about siding with the United States. With the conclusion of its Korea policy review, the Biden administration has made it known it is ready to conduct diplomacy with the North, but that the ball is in North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un’s court. There are reports of “significant communication” between North and South Korea beginning around the time of the summit, leading to speculation about possible North-South engagement activities, but no details have emerged. Pyongyang will exploit such engagement, so the Moon administration should reconsider its support. Despite this communication, the ROK Ministry of Defense now assesses the Kim regime is focused on internal affairs. The North continues to struggle with its failed economy, COVID-19 mitigation measures, the effects of natural disasters, and sanctions. Pro-engagement Korea watchers interpreted a reported change to the Workers’ Party of Korea’s rules as an indication Pyongyang would no longer seek to unify Korea through revolution, even though the North’s constitution insists on it. Their hopes were quickly dashed when Pyongyang’s Propaganda and Agitation Department issued a clarification saying unification via revolution remains the objective.

 

2.  Remarks by President Moon Jae-in Leaving Cornwall after G7 Summit

english1.president.go.kr · June 13, 2021

I wonder if there had been at least a "pull-aside “discussion between President Moon and Prime Minister Suga if these remarks would have been edited differently.  But these two historical events are very much worth remembering and considering when the international community is faced with complex problems, especially among those who value and respect sovereignty and self determination.

Excerpts:My first face-to-face encounter with Prime Minister Suga of Japan was a precious moment that could have marked a new beginning in bilateral relations, but I regret that it did not lead to an official meeting.

While participating in the G7 Summit, two historical events lingered in my mind. One was the International Peace Conference held in The Hague in 1907. The patriotic martyr Yi Jun, a secret emissary of our Emperor, arrived there via the Trans-Siberian Railway to call attention to imperial Japan’s deprivation of Korea’s diplomatic rights, but he couldn’t even enter the conference room. The other was the Potsdam Conference, through which the Korean Peninsula’s division was decided. We were not even able to speak up as our fate was determined by the major powers of the day.

Today, the Republic of Korea has become one of the world’s 10 largest economies and a country where people – with unrivaled civic awareness – act in unison for democracy, epidemic prevention and control and carbon neutrality. Now, we have become a nation that can determine our own destiny and engage in mutual support and cooperation with other countries.

 

3. North Korean defector says 'even North Korea was not this nuts' after attending Ivy League school

foxnews.com · by Teny Sahakian

Yeonmi Park pulls no punches.  There is a 7 minute video at this link.

 

4. Unification minister puts U.S. trip on hold amid uncertainty over inter-Korean relations

en.yna.co.kr · by 고병준 · June 15, 2021

Does this  indicate north-South communications and that something may be brewing.

We should also note, the Unification Minister has no counterpart in the US.

 

5. Minister vows efforts to resume stalled talks with N. Korea on summit anniv.

en.yna.co.kr · by 고병준 · June 15, 2021

Again, can we read between the lines here and assess that there are ongoing communications between north and South?  Is something in the offing?

 

6. How can Korea make the best of the G7 summit?

The Korea Times · by Ahn Ho-young · June 15, 2021

Important guidance and recommendations from Ambassador Ahn.

Excerpts:Now, almost 10 years later, Korea has again attended a G7 summit. My hope is that it will prove to be more than a one-time event and serve as another opportunity for Korea to enhance its stature on global issues.

There are several points we have to reflect on for that to happen. First of all, we must understand the changes the G7 went through over the years. The intervening years saw many important changes in the strategic, economic, technological, environmental and even health conditions around the world, such that we often talk about today being a time of global uncertainty.

...

As for how to make the best of this opportunity, Korea must not be timid in declaring its intention to join other democracies, to play a role commensurate with its capabilities, and to shed itself of the perception that Korea is becoming increasingly backward and inward-looking. In the wake of the May 14 Korea-U.S. Summit and its joint statement, I wrote in this column of my pleasant surprise, and the importance of implementing it. Let us hope that Korea's participation at the Cornwall Summit will serve as another timely juncture for Korea to move in that direction.

 

7. Border to get robot cameras, AI monitoring (Korea)

koreajoongangdaily.joins.com · by Michael Lee  · June 15, 2021

Border (DMZ) operations require manpower.  Technology can be a force multiplier but it cannot replace boots on the ground patrolling.  This is I have long advocated returning US forces to patrolling the DMZ.  However, rather than a US sector as we had in the past , US infantry battalions should rotate in with the ROK Divisions throughout the DM. Doing this would improve the amount of boots on the ground, supplement the ROK forces, demonstrate US commitment, improve US small unit training, and provide a morale boost to US rotational forces.  But I do not think there is any will for this on the ROK or US side.

 

8. Entire border patrol unit in North Hamgyong Province placed into quarantine following "paratyphoid" outbreak

dailynk.com · by Kim Yoo Jin · June 15, 2021

Does "paratyphoid" outbreak provide a cover for a COVID outbreak?  This bears watching.

 

9. Why Does the Gov't Disregard Veterans? (South Korea)

english.chosun.com

A sad commentary: "All countries reward veterans and the families of the fallen. But this populist government thinks that veterans' affairs are somehow a rightwing concern and must be spat on. The families of the Cheonan victims are weeping, and Korean War veterans do not have enough money to buy medicine. This is a travesty."

 

10. Japan nixed meeting between Suga, Moon at G7

koreajoongangdaily.joins.com · by Sarah Kim  · June 15, 2021

 

11. South Korea-Japan ties sour amid fresh military drills near disputed islands

The Guardian · by Justin McCurry · June 15, 2021

And I would also expect China and/or Russia to penetrate the Korean ADIZ in the area in the near future in order to cause a ROK and Japanese reaction and create more ROK/Japan friction.

 

12. North Korea: Why the Kingdom of Kim Jong Un Can Never Be Normal

The National Interest · by Doug Bandow · June 14, 2021

Dangerous recommendations.  Embarking on an arms control process would make Kim believe his political warfare strategy and blackmail diplomacy is success and rather than negotiate in good faith he will double down.  To Kim, arms control negotiations mean he will keep hi nuclear weapons.

In regards to isolation, that is Kim's choice. He has had plenty of opportunities to open his country to economic development.  But he has made the deliberate policy decision to keep his country isolated.

And lastly there is no mention of human rights in north Korea.  Do we really want to provide economic development  for the north in the hopes that the regime will change?  We tried that for 10 years from 1997 through 2007 and Kim Jong-il exploited all of that aid to develop and test his first nuclear device in 2006.

Excerpts: Most realistic would be a focus on arms control, with the hope of developing a relationship that might lead to denuclearization. Even such a more limited objective would be advanced by developing a broader and more normal relationship. Meaning diplomatic ties—officials contacts are especially important with potentially dangerous adversaries—cultural exchanges, and economic ties.

The question ultimately is, what makes for a safer Northeast Asia? An isolated, sanctioned, and impoverished North Korea, depending on a hostile PRC and possessing a swelling nuclear arsenal? Or a more prosperous, engaged, and connected DPRK, with economic and political ties well beyond Beijing, which might prove willing to negotiate away at least part of its potential arsenal?

The skeptics might be right, that Kim wants nukes for ill-use, such as a new war to unify the peninsula. However, isolation is the counsel of despair. That future would rapidly grow ever darker as the North increased its nuclear and missile arsenals.

Moreover, so far Kim has behaved differently than his predecessors in significant ways. Although no liberal, he appears to harbor no illusions about the difficulties facing his nation and therefore likely realizes the disastrous outcome of any conflict. Thus, Washington should test him by moving away from what North Korea calls today’s “hostile” policy.

 

-------------------

 

 

“Grand strategy is about marrying ends to means, about doing what you can, consistent with the nation's capabilities and resources.”

- Robert D. Kaplan, Earning the Rockies: How Geography Shapes America's Role in the World

 

"Every revolution has its counterrevolution that is a sign the revolution is for real. And every revolution must defend itself against this counterrevolution, or the revolution will fail."

- C. Wright Mills,  Listen Yankee (1960), pp. 54.

 

"A boxer derives the greatest advantage from his sparring partner – and my accuser is my sparring partner. He trains me in patience, civility and even temper."

- Marcus Aurelius 

DanielRiggs Tue, 06/15/2021 - 9:31am
06/14/2021 News & Commentary – National Security

News & commentary by Dave Maxwell. Edited and published by Daniel Riggs

 

Happy Birthday U.S. Army.

 

1. This was one of the worst weeks for China on the world stage in a while

2. Exclusive: US assessing reported leak at Chinese nuclear power facility

3. U.S. Fight Against Chinese 5G Efforts Shifts From Threats to Incentives

4. Heads of G7 agree to invest on B3W infrastructure

5. How Congress can fight Hamas's use of human shields

6. The personal impact of an American general on an Afghan officer

7.  FDD | Biden Lifts Sanctions on Firms Linked to Key Assad Backer

8. FDD | What to Expect From the Biden-Putin Summit

9. Beijing Protests a Lab Leak Too Much

10. How States Can Respond If Biden Lifts Iran Sanctions

11. North Korea tries to accelerate building of walls and fences along border with China

12. NATO allies seek clarity on maintaining secure facilities in Afghanistan following troop withdrawal

13. G7 ballyhoos challenge to China’s Belt and Road

14. Imperfect competition between US and China: Statesman

15. Ransomware’s suspected Russian roots point to a long detente between the Kremlin and hackers

16. The West is uniting to confront China. How worried should Beijing be?

17. NATO to look eastward and inward at summit

18. Biden’s B3W proposal no serious threat to China’s BRI

19. Biden meets with foreign leaders as ambassadorships sit vacant

20. The Party Is Not Forever | by Minxin Pei

21. US father and son admit helping Ghosn flee Japan

22. Why We Can’t Move On From Jan. 6

23. Analysis: Mystery of 1999 US stealth jet shootdown returns with twist

 

1. This was one of the worst weeks for China on the world stage in a while

news.yahoo.com · by Linette Lopez

Excerpts: “Legendary American diplomat George Kennan - known for outlining the US policy of containing the USSR during the Cold War - used to say that the US people are always about 10 years behind its diplomats when it comes to seeing danger from abroad. Lecturing back in 1950 he compared democracies to a giant prehistoric monster "with a body as long as this room and a brain the size of a pin" that needs to be directly confronted with a problem before it awakens from the "comfortable primeval mud." But when a challenge does gain our attention, Kennan said, the country lashes out with "such blind determination that he not only destroys his adversary but largely wrecks his native habitat."

Perhaps the US has learned something from Kennan. Consider the Senate's passage of a 2,400 page bill aimed at shoring up the US as an economic and technological superpower. The size and scope of the bill shows that our leaders are trying to meet a challenge before it's an emergency.

 

2. Exclusive: US assessing reported leak at Chinese nuclear power facility

CNN · by Zachary Cohen

For those who remember - Three Mile Island or Chernobyl?

Excerpts: “While US officials have deemed the situation does not currently pose a severe safety threat to workers at the plant or Chinese public, it is unusual that a foreign company would unilaterally reach out to the American government for help when its Chinese state-owned partner is yet to acknowledge a problem exists. The scenario could put the US in a complicated situation should the leak continue or become more severe without being fixed.

However, concern was significant enough that the National Security Council held multiple meetings last week as they monitored the situation, including two at the deputy level and another gathering at the assistant secretary level on Friday, which was led by NSC Senior Director for China Laura Rosenberger and Senior Director for Arms Control Mallory Stewart, according to US officials.

...

Still, Rofer, the retired nuclear scientist, warns that a gas leak could indicate bigger problems.

"If they do have a gas leak, that indicates some of their containment is broken," Rofer said. "It also argues that maybe some of the fuel elements could be broken, which would be a more serious problem."

"That would be a reason for shutting down the reactor and would then require the reactor to be refueled," Rofer told CNN, adding that removing the fuel elements must be done carefully.

For now, US officials do not think the leak is at "crisis level," but acknowledge it is increasing and bears monitoring, the source familiar with the situation told CNN.

While there is a chance the situation could become a disaster, US officials currently believe it is more likely that it will not become one, the source added.

 

3. U.S. Fight Against Chinese 5G Efforts Shifts From Threats to Incentives

WSJ · by Stu Woo and Drew Hinshaw

Excerpts: “Ms. Kaptur said such countries still have weak economies and should be offered alternatives to Beijing-backed infrastructure projects. “They are countries at risk,” she said.

Many Central and Eastern European countries, including Romania, Poland, the Czech Republic and the Baltic states, have been broadly receptive to American arguments against Huawei. Many also view strong military relations with the U.S. as vital after Russia’s 2014 annexation of Ukraine’s Crimean peninsula.

Many have been skeptical of China, too. In 2019, Poland jailed a Huawei executive on espionage charges, while Baltic and Romanian governments have taken steps to limit their countries’ use of Huawei. Czech Prime Minister Andrej Babis has demanded China replace its current ambassador to his country, after a series of public spats largely about the role of Huawei in the country.

Yet the Chinese government has found partners in the region, particularly in Hungary, whose capital Budapest is hosting a new Huawei research center. Huawei opened a similar center in Serbia last year. Several countries have also signed up for Beijing’s Belt and Road program, in which Chinese government-backed institutions largely finance and build highways, ports and other infrastructure.

 

4. Heads of G7 agree to invest on B3W infrastructure

donga.com · June 14, 2021

The Korean press is picking up on the B3W narrative.

Excerpt:According to the White House, heads of G7 countries including U.S. President Joe Biden agreed to invest on the global infrastructure at the G7 summit held in Cornwall, the U.K. on Saturday (local time). The project is called “B3W (Build Back Better World),” which was named after Biden’s presidential campaign “Build Back Better.” It is garnering attention as it is the first alternative of advanced countries against China’s project.

 

5. How Congress can fight Hamas's use of human shields

The Hill · by Orde F. Kittrie and Matthew Zweig · June 11, 2021

Conclusion: ”Finally, Congress should request that the administration pursue a legally binding UN Security Council Resolution (UNSCR) focused on countering human shields use by terrorists. It would not have to address a particular situation, armed conflict, or illicit armed group, and may not draw a veto from China or from Russia (which itself has repeatedly complained of human shields use against it).The resolution could require all member states to take steps to hinder, and impose consequences for, human shields use. This includes adopting national legislation criminalizing human shields use. Similar resolutions have already required national legislation and other measures to counter terrorism, the recruitment of foreign fighters, and the proliferation of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons.

Congress has led the way before in combating the use of human shields; it should lead again.

 

6. The personal impact of an American general on an Afghan officer

militarytimes.com · by Col. Abdul Rahman Rahmani · June 11, 2021

 

7. FDD | Biden Lifts Sanctions on Firms Linked to Key Assad Backer

fdd.org · by David Adesnik · June 11, 2021

Excerpts:The appearance of hesitation to hold the Assad regime accountable comes at an inopportune moment as Biden prepares for his first summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin. A major issue of contention there will be Putin’s readiness to employ starvation as a weapon against Syrian civilians who remain in areas outside the Assad regime’s control. Specifically, Putin may employ Russia’s veto to block the UN Security Council’s reauthorization of aid deliveries into northwest Syria directly from Turkey, a route that bypasses Damascus, thereby preventing Assad from blocking or diverting the shipments.

If the administration did lift sanctions on ASM and Silver Pine as an indicator of goodwill toward Assad, Moscow, or Tehran, that would be a mistake, since they have no record of reciprocating. Within the past week, Syrian shelling and Russian air raids killed even more civilians. Concessions at this point would likely communicate a lack of resolve on Washington’s part.

The administration should quickly clarify why it chose to delist two of Foz’s companies. If it alleges their conduct has changed, it should present evidence of that change, since Foz and his other companies remain leading contributors to the Assad regime’s finances. More broadly, the administration should clarify its still-undefined policy toward Syria and appoint a special envoy of a stature comparable to those who served under the previous administration.

 

8. FDD | What to Expect From the Biden-Putin Summit

fdd.org · by Thomas Joscelyn · June 11, 2021

Excerpt: “The summary above is just a cursory look at the points of tension between the U.S. and Russia. The Biden administration has repeatedly stated it does not think that relations between the U.S. and Russia “need to continue on a negative trajectory.”

 

9. Beijing Protests a Lab Leak Too Much

WSJ · by Perry Link

China as a Shakespearean tragedy?

Excerpt:The Chinese Communist Party’s official account of the virus is that it “jumped” from bats to humans at a wet market not far from the Wuhan lab. The city government was quick to close down that market, seal it off and provide the world with photos showing that the sealing had been done. Why were the authorities so swift and conspicuous? Because they suspected the wet market or because they wanted the world to? If they were certain that Mother Nature was the culprit, why silence their scientists and seal laboratory records? And why begin a vicious cyberstruggle against someone who records daily life as she sees it?

 

10. How States Can Respond If Biden Lifts Iran Sanctions

National Review Online · by Richard Goldberg · June 11, 2021

Excerpts:Governors could get even more creative. Willie Sutton infamously said he robbed banks because “that’s where the money is.” The same is true for effective sanctions policy — target the banks and financial transactions.

The State of Florida passed an Iran banking law in 2012 that required all chartered banks to certify that they did not engage in transactions with the Central Bank of Iran or other dirty Iranian banks. The hiccup: The list of those companies would be based on the U.S. Treasury Department’s sanctions list, which isn’t much help as the Biden administration prepares to lift most Iran sanctions.

There may be an easy fix for Florida and other interested governors. As it happens, foreign banks must apply to state regulators to open offices and establish representation. States could add a simple certification requirement for existing and future applicants: With an exception for trade in food and medicine, the bank must pledge it will not facilitate transactions with or for any entity in the Islamic Republic of Iran.

 

11. North Korea tries to accelerate building of walls and fences along border with China

dailynk.com · Ha Yoon Ah · June 14, 2021

As Frost wrote: "good fences make good neighbors."

 

12. NATO allies seek clarity on maintaining secure facilities in Afghanistan following troop withdrawal

The Washington Post · by Karen DeYoung · June 13, 2021

A lot of details:”Asked about the airport and medical facility in Kabul, McKenzie said “our plans are very far advanced on what our posture is going to look like after we complete the withdrawal” of U.S. forces “and of course our NATO and other partners there.”

But while “I recognize it’s a subject of abiding interest to many people,” he said, making such information public could give tactical advantage “to those who would attack us.”

Health-care standards in Kabul are so poor that most embassies would be forced to shut down if the medical facility adjacent to the international airport, equipped to provide care to diplomats and NATO personnel, although without an intensive care capability, was not able to remain operational and in a secure environment.

 

13. G7 ballyhoos challenge to China’s Belt and Road

asiatimes.com · by Richard Javad Heydarian · June 14, 2021

The acronym B3W may be catching on.

Excerpts: “US President Joe Biden, who has placed China at the heart of his global strategy, has been the driving force behind the mega-initiatives in tandem with key allies. The stated aim is not to compete with China on a dollar-to-dollar or vaccine-to-vaccine basis per se, but instead provide the rules of the road for a transparent and democratic global order.

It marks a major departure from the days of the Trump administration, which alienated G7 allies with its bellicose and “America First” protectionist rhetoric, while constantly criticizing China without providing any concrete alternatives.

In a statement, the White House described the B3W as an indispensable initiative to “help narrow the $40+ trillion infrastructure need in the developing world, which has been exacerbated by the Covid-19 pandemic.”

“The driving animating purpose of this G7 summit is to show that democracy can deliver against the biggest challenges we’re facing in the world,” a senior Biden administration official told the media, underscoring the ideological element of the grouping as a club of like-minded democracies.

 

14. Imperfect competition between US and China: Statesman

straitstimes.com · June 14, 2021

A view from India.

 

15. Ransomware’s suspected Russian roots point to a long detente between the Kremlin and hackers

The Washington Post · by Isabelle Khurshudyan and Loveday Morris · June 12, 2021

"Detente?" This is more like Hybrid Warfare (from Frank Hoffman):

“A hybrid threat transcends a blend of regular and irregular tactics. More than a decade ago, it was defined as an adversary that “simultaneously and adaptively employs a fused mix of conventional weapons, irregular tactics, catastrophic terrorism, and criminal behavior in the battlespace to obtain desired political objectives.”54 The criminal, or more broadly “socially disruptive behavior,” and mass terrorism aspects should not be overlooked, but the fusion of advanced military capabilities with irregular forces and tactics is key, and has appeared repeatedly during the past decade from Hezbollah to the Russian campaigns in Georgia and Ukraine.55 Hezbollah’s method of fighting Israel as is described by its leader Hassan Nasrallah, is an organic response to its security dilemma and “not a conventional army and not a guerrilla force, it is something in between.”56 As lethal as Hezbollah has been in the past decade, we should be concerned about the lessons it is learning in Syria from the Russians.57

Hybrid threats can also be created by a state actor using a proxy force. A proxy force sponsored by a major power can generate hybrid threats readily using advanced military capabilities provided by the sponsor. Proxy wars, appealing to some as “warfare on the cheap” are historically ubiquitous but chronically understudied.58

 

16. The West is uniting to confront China. How worried should Beijing be?

CNN · by Nectar Gan, Jill Disis and Ben Westcott

 

17. NATO to look eastward and inward at summit

Defense News · by Sebastian Sprenger · June 13, 2021

Excerpts: “The summit is also expected to formally order the production of a new NATO strategic concept, to conclude within a year. That work amounts to a wholesale revision of alliance guidance, to which member nations align their national defense plans. The most recent concept hails from 2010, predating Russia’s 2014 annexation of Crimea from Ukraine that changed the strategic calculus for European governments.

“The new strategic concept would be a milestone, as so many issues regarding threats and deterrence flow from it,” said German lawmaker Tobias Lindner, the Green Party’s point man for defense issues in the Bundestag.

The topic of deterrence — nuclear, that is — is expected to make a reprise in Germany following the federal election in late September, where the Greens have a shot at joining the next governing coalition, according to recent polls.

Whenever major defense questions come up in the country, Germany’s continued participation in NATO’s nuclear-sharing arrangement — meaning German Tornado aircraft carrying U.S. atomic bombs into a hypothetical war – ends up on the table.

 

18.  Biden’s B3W proposal no serious threat to China’s BRI

asiatimes.com · by  Dnyanesh Kamat · June 14, 2021

I expect to see a lot of this criticism. I had expected to read more already but perhaps it is just too soon.

As I understand it, funding from BRI does have strings attached. The biggest being if you default on the loans.

But here is the author's view in conclusion:The world would rather sign up to BRI projects, based on hard-nosed realpolitik, than America’s B3W, based on woolly feel-good values that the US is very obviously only paying lip service to.

B3W found a vague single-line mention in the communiqué issued at the end of the recent Group of Seven summit. This is perhaps a sign that the rest of the G7 members recognized it for what it was – verbal gimmickry aimed at a domestic audience by a newly elected president desperate for a foreign-policy victory.

 

19.  Biden meets with foreign leaders as ambassadorships sit vacant

The Hill · by Brett Samuels · June 13, 2021

 

20.  The Party Is Not Forever | by Minxin Pei

project-syndicate.org · by Minxin Pei · June 11, 2021

I had not heard this thesis before. Xi is adopting the north Korean model??

Excerpts: “That is perhaps why the Singapore model has lost its luster in the Xi era, whereas the North Korean model – totalitarian political repression, a cult of the supreme leader, and juche (economic self-reliance) – has grown more appealing. True, China has not yet become a giant North Korea, but a number of trends over the last eight years have moved the country in that direction.

...

Politically, the rule of fear has returned, not only for ordinary people, but also for the CPC’s elites, as Xi has reinstated purges under the guise of a perpetual anti-corruption campaign. Censorship is at its highest level in the post-Mao era, and Xi’s regime has all but eliminated space for civil society, including NGOs. The authorities have even reined in China’s freewheeling private entrepreneurs with regulatory crackdowns, criminal prosecution, and confiscation of wealth.

And Xi has assiduously nurtured a personality cult. These days, the front page of the People’s Daily newspaper is filled with coverage of Xi’s activities and personal edicts. The abridged history of the CPC, recently released to mark the party’s centennial, devotes a quarter of its content to Xi’s eight years in power, while giving only half as much space to Deng Xiaoping, the CPC’s true savior.

Economically, China has yet to embrace juche fully. But the CPC’s new Five-Year Plan projects a vision of technological self-sufficiency and economic security centered on domestic growth. Although the party has a reasonable excuse – America’s strategy of economic and technological decoupling leaves it no alternative – few Western democracies will want to remain economically coupled with a country that sees North Korea as its future political model.

When China’s leaders toast the CPC’s centennial, they should ask whether the party is on the right track. If it is not, the CPC’s upcoming milestone may be its last.

 

21. US father and son admit helping Ghosn flee Japan

asiatimes.com · by Hiroshi Hiyama · June 14, 2021

Japan has an extremely high conviction rate because they do not go to trial until defendants effectively confess or plead guilty.

 

22. Why We Can’t Move On From Jan. 6

WSJ · by Peggy Noonan

 

23. Analysis: Mystery of 1999 US stealth jet shootdown returns with twist

asia.nikkei.com

Some fascinating "analysis."

 

----------------

 

"I am a Soldier, I fight where I am told, and I win where I fight."

- George S. Patton

 

 “People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf.” 

- Richard Grenier while discussing the works of George Orwell

 

"American soldiers in battle don't fight for what some president says on T.V., they don't fight for mom, apple pie, the American flag...they fight for one another."

-Hal Moore

DanielRiggs Mon, 06/14/2021 - 9:42am
06/14/2021 News & Commentary – Korea

News & commentary by Dave Maxwell. Edited and published by Daniel Riggs

 

Happy Birthday U.S. Army.

 

1. G-7 calls for 'complete' denuclearization of Korean Peninsula, welcomes Washington's readiness towards Pyongyang diplomacy

2. Moon signs on to Biden's statement on freedoms

3. Ordinary Pyongyang residents have not received government rations since mid-April 

4. N.K. leader sends birthday gift to miner to emphasize 'self-reliance'

5. Moon says S. Korea will push for COVID-19 vaccine supplies if North Korea agrees

6. South Korean shipbuilders unveil competing carrier designs

7. North Korea tries to accelerate building of walls and fences along border with China

8. Korea to conduct Dokdo defense drill this week

9. Japan-South Korea Spat at G-7 Shows Biden’s Challenge With China

10. Soured ties between Korea, Japan exposed at G7

11. Korea's Balancing Act Is Getting More Precarious

12. “S. Korean agents are painting Chinese banknotes with coronavirus and sending them.” Kim Jong-un gives direct orders to clean up money transfer brokers.

13. Worker’s Party of Korea Central Committee Plenary Session: No Details Yet

 

1. G-7 calls for 'complete' denuclearization of Korean Peninsula, welcomes Washington's readiness towards Pyongyang diplomacy

en.yna.co.kr · by 장동우 · June 14, 2021

It seems the ROK and US have gotten every major organization (Quad, G7, UN) and major countries to support denuclearization of the Korean peninsula. Everybody but north Korea!

 

2. Moon signs on to Biden's statement on freedoms

koreajoongangdaily.joins.com · by Ser Myo-Ja  · June 14, 2021

human rights and democratic rule of law

We have to wait and see what kind of blowback there is for South Korea from China.

 

3. Ordinary Pyongyang residents have not received government rations since mid-April 

dailynk.com · by Seulkee Jang · June 14, 2021

Not a good sign. When the public distribution throughout the north collapse during the arduous march of 94-96 the people developed markets to survive. But with the crackdowns due to COVID and the closure of the Chinese border, the citizens of Pyongyang have no relief valve. What happens when we begin to see unrest in Pyongyang? (I am sure that there will be an immediate crackdown and anyone found resisting will be sent to the gulags (with three generations) if they are not executed).

 

4. N.K. leader sends birthday gift to miner to emphasize 'self-reliance'

en.yna.co.kr · by 이원주 · June 14, 2021

An interesting development.

Excerpts:The KCNA praised Ko and his team members as "heroes" for contributing to increased mineral production and for reaching their goals ahead of schedule for the first year of the five-year economic plan unveiled at a party congress in January.

It is rare for Kim to deliver such a gift to an ordinary miner on his 60th birthday. Such a gift has usually been granted to independence fighters and those aged 100 or older.

The North appears to be stressing the achievements of miners from the Komdok region that have helped build a more self-reliant economy during the 1970s by exporting minerals.

 

5. Moon says S. Korea will push for COVID-19 vaccine supplies if North Korea agrees

en.yna.co.kr · by 이치동 · June 14, 2021

IF north Korea agrees. That is a big "if."

When would north Korea be ready to ask for help? How bad will it have to get inside north Korea?

Excerpt: "We are not aware of whether North Korea has taken any position with regard to that and there is relevant data (on its coronavirus situation)," he said. "In case of any signal from North Korea (for requesting help), we will of course help."

 

6. South Korean shipbuilders unveil competing carrier designs

Defense News · by Brian Kim · June 12, 2021

Excerpts:The shipyard displayed a 1-to-400 scale model of its proposed carrier, which would be 270 meters long and 60 meters wide. The carrier, with its twin island superstructures, would have a displacement of 30,000-35,000 tons and a full-load displacement of 450,000-500,000 tons, according to an HHI spokesman.

“This new design suggests a flight deck 30 percent larger than the former design and an optional ski jump ramp over the bow with a view to improve operational capabilities of fighter jets onboard,” the spokesman told Defense News on June 11. “The modular ski jump could be removed and the flight deck could be modified to accept a catapult.”

The carrier would be able to carry up to 16 short-takeoff-and-vertical-landing aircraft on its flight deck and a further eight in its hanger, he said. The ski jump-styled takeoff ramp would permit jets without the STOVL capability to more easily launch from the ship. In addition, some 24 helicopters could be flown with the CVX.

The proposed model has an auxiliary deck at the stern for operating small rotary-wing drones and an adapted well deck from which to deploy unmanned surface vehicles or unmanned underwater vehicles.

The spokesman revealed his company has a contract with U.K.-based Babcock International for consultancy services related to the basic design of the CVX. Babcock is a member of the Aircraft Carrier Alliance, which built both the Prince of Wales and Queen Elizabeth carriers.

 

7. North Korea tries to accelerate building of walls and fences along border with China

dailynk.com · by Ha Yoon Ah · June 14, 2021

As Frost wrote: "good fences make good neighbors."

 

8. Korea to conduct Dokdo defense drill this week

Bloomberg · by Jon Herskovitz · June 14, 2021

This will not help Korea-Japan relations.

 

9. Japan-South Korea Spat at G-7 Shows Biden’s Challenge With China

Bloomberg · by Jon Herskovitz · June 14, 2021

Not a good sign:

“The two sides couldn’t even agree on why the meeting didn’t take place. The Seoul-based Yonhap News Agency on Monday quoted an unnamed South Korean Foreign Ministry official as saying Japan broke a tentative agreement for the two leaders to have a longer meeting. But when the South Korean side tried to follow up, they received no response from Japanese officials, the report said.

That official told Yonhap that Japan didn’t want to talk because of Seoul’s plans to hold military drills this week on and around islets that Koreans call Dokdo, which are claimed by both countries but occupied by South Korea. Previous drills around the islands that Japan calls Takeshima have been met with protests from Tokyo and caused strains in ties.

Katsunobu Kato, the Japanese government’s top spokesman, denied there was any tentative agreement for a meeting, adding at a news briefing Monday such a report was “extremely regrettable.” He also said Tokyo has called on Seoul to cancel the military exercises.

Whatever the situation may actually be, it’s a problem that isn’t going away for Biden.

 

10. Soured ties between Korea, Japan exposed at G7

The Korea Times · by · June 14, 2021

I think we all thought (or at least hoped) some kind of meeting would take place despite all sides appearing to manage expectations before the G7.

Excerpts:Claiming that Korea was worsening the situation, Suga also demanded that Moon resolve the issues involving wartime forced labor and sex slavery, over which the two countries have ongoing disputes.

Meanwhile, according to Japan's Nihon Keizai Shimbun newspaper, the Japanese government told U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson that it did not want to expand the G7. Korea, along with Australia, India and South Africa, were invited to the G7 Summit as guest countries.

Japan's opposition to the expansion is seen as an effort to remain Asia's lone G7 member country.

When former U.S. President Donald Trump mentioned a possible G7 expansion to include Korea, last year, the Japanese government made clear its opposition to Korea participating in the group of advanced economies.

In fact, the expansion of the G7 was not discussed during the summit at all, although it is not known whether Japan's voice was an influencing factor.

 

11. Korea's Balancing Act Is Getting More Precarious

english.chosun.com

I expect we will see some Chinese retaliation against South Korea in some form of political and economic warfare.

 

12. “S. Korean agents are painting Chinese banknotes with coronavirus and sending them.” Kim Jong-un gives direct orders to clean up money transfer brokers.

asiapress.org

QAnon does not have a lock on conspiracy theories.

 

13. Worker’s Party of Korea Central Committee Plenary Session: No Details Yet

The National Interest · by Eli Fuhrman · June 13, 2021

But we have to observe for indicators that the regime may try to "externalize" its domestic problem.

 

----------------

 

"I am a Soldier, I fight where I am told, and I win where I fight."

- George S. Patton

 

 “People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf.” 

- Richard Grenier while discussing the works of George Orwell

 

"American soldiers in battle don't fight for what some president says on T.V., they don't fight for mom, apple pie, the American flag...they fight for one another."

-Hal Moore

DanielRiggs Mon, 06/14/2021 - 9:19am
06/13/2021 News & Commentary – National Security

News & commentary by Dave Maxwell. Edited and published by Daniel Riggs

1. House tees up war authorization repeal while Senate waits on White House

2. Opinion | Don’t cede the Asia-Pacific to China. The U.S. must learn from its TPP mistake.

3. Rare earth metals at the heart of China's rivalry with US, Europe

4. G7 set to agree ‘green belt and road’ plan to tackle China’s influence

5. U.S. contractor to pay $5.28 million to Abu Ghraib prisoners

6. 'Be ready': Australia warned about China's 'grey zone' war

7. FACT SHEET: President Biden and G7 Leaders Launch Build Back Better World (B3W) Partnership

8. 'Build Back Better World': G7 leaders back developing world spending plan to rival China 

9. UN rights commissioner warns of escalating violence in Myanmar

10. FBI Using NSA to Conduct Unconstitutional ‘Warrantless’ Searches for ‘Extremists’

11. China cautions G7: 'small' groups don't rule the world

12. 2021 G7 Leaders' communiqué: Our shared agenda for global action to build back better

13. 'Xi Jinping is my spiritual leader': China's education drive in Tibet

14. The US military is tearing itself apart over 'wokeness' and it's only helping America's enemies

15. Biden’s Blue Dot seeks to derail China’s Belt and Road

16. My Mother Eleni: The Search for her Executioners (published in 1983 about the Greek Civil War)

 

1. House tees up war authorization repeal while Senate waits on White House

Defense News · by Joe Gould · June 13, 2021

This could be a very interesting debate. How this turns out may very well indicate the direction of US foreign policy and national security for years to come.

Excerpt: “A National Security Council spokesman confirmed the White House is working with Kaine and others, and that Biden wants to ensure the existing authorizations for the use of military force “are replaced with a narrow and specific framework that will ensure we can protect Americans from terrorist threats while ending the forever wars.”

The NSC is “committed to working with Congress as they move this legislation forward,” he added.

 

2. Opinion | Don’t cede the Asia-Pacific to China. The U.S. must learn from its TPP mistake.

The Washington Post · by Tom Carper and John Cornyn · June 13, 2021

Pulling out of TPP was arguably one of the biggest strategic mistakes of the previous administration. Think of where we could potentially in terms of the economic strength of the TPP versus malign economic behavior of authoritarian regimes.

 

3. Rare earth metals at the heart of China's rivalry with US, Europe

RFI · June 13, 2021

Excerpts: “China is expected to remain dominant for some time to come, but Schafer said that if recycling is scaled up, "20 to 30 percent of Europe's rare earth magnet needs by 2030 could be sourced domestically in the EU from literally zero today."

The desire to accelerate rare earth production comes amid a shortage of semiconductors, which are essential for the computing and automotive industries and mostly manufactured in Asia.

The scarcity "has caused global manufacturers to think about their supply chain in a new way, and think about vulnerabilities," a spokesman for MP Materials said, adding that several European automotive and wind power firms are already in contact with the company.

 

4.G7 set to agree ‘green belt and road’ plan to tackle China’s influence

Financial Times · by Jasmine Cameron-Chileshe · June 12, 2021

Excerpts: “Johnson wants to focus on supporting green initiatives and has been wary of presenting the initiative as an “anti-China” move. British officials say they want the G7 to “show what we are for, not who we are against”.

But the White House favours a wider package of infrastructure support and is explicit about wanting to provide a new counterweight to China’s influence.

“We have a slightly narrower focus,” said one British official.

On Saturday G7 leaders held talks to co-ordinate China strategy. “There was broad agreement that we should co-operate with Beijing on things like fighting climate change, compete in areas like global supply chains and contest on issues like human rights,” said one official briefed on the talks.

 

5.  U.S. contractor to pay $5.28 million to Abu Ghraib prisoners

CBS News · June 12, 2021

Excerpts: “In the case against CACI, four Iraqis who say they were tortured are seeking compensation from the company, which provided interrogators to the U.S. military during the war. CACI has chosen to continue its fight against the lawsuit. Azmy said a trial is expected this summer.

In its defense four years ago against the lawsuit, L-3 said the fact that the claims in the case "cannot be brought against the government means that they also cannot be brought against L-3."

"No court in the United States has allowed aliens -- detained on the battlefield or in the course of postwar occupation and military operations by the U.S. military -- to seek damages for their detention," the company told the federal court four years ago. "Yet these plaintiffs bring claims seeking money damages for their detention and treatment while in the custody of the U.S. military in the midst of a belligerent occupation in Iraq."

Allowing the case to proceed "would require a wholly unprecedented injection of the judiciary into wartime military operations and occupation conduct against the local population, in particular the conditions of confinement and interrogation for intelligence gathering," L-3 added.

 

6. 'Be ready': Australia warned about China's 'grey zone' war

au.news.yahoo.com

A very strong statement from Foriegn Minister Yu:Dr Joseph Wu spoke to The Weekend Australian and said China was preparing for war and "we all need to be ready for that".

"The new phenomenon we are seeing is part of what I would describe as China's 'grey zone' operations, where it sends in its maritime militia – large fishing boats armed, operated and following the orders of China’s navy – to harass and intimidate their perceived enemies," he said.

"This is something Australia hasn't experienced yet – but it is coming."

 

7. FACT SHEET: President Biden and G7 Leaders Launch Build Back Better World (B3W) Partnership

White House Briefings

President Biden used B3W (said we are calling it B3W) in his remarks at his press conference today from the UK. As I asked in another message, have we developed the information and influence campaign to dominate the narrative? And will our G7 and D10 partners embrace this and begin to support the narrative? We will have to goggle B3W every day to see how effective the new plan and the names are growing in usage. Is the GEC at State taking the lead?

 

8.  'Build Back Better World': G7 leaders back developing world spending plan to rival China 

Euro News

The media is beginning to describe the B3W plan (and this is from yesterday). Perhaps after POTUS' press conference today and his use of the term it will begin to grow legs.

9. UN rights commissioner warns of escalating violence in Myanmar

bdnews24.com 

This is one of those predictions that unfortunately is likely to come true.

 

10. FBI Using NSA to Conduct Unconstitutional ‘Warrantless’ Searches for ‘Extremists’

americandefensenews.com · by Paul Crespo

Excerpts: “In the newly released FISA report, a judge said the FBI’s Fourth Amendment violations were still “apparently widespread.”

The Daily Mail also noted that it is unclear from the FISA report whether the FBI uncovered any criminal ‘extremist’ behavior or made any arrests resulting from the searches. Also unknown is what the Bureau did with seized data that was harmless or irrelevant to its search.

What is also unclear is just how many law abiding Americans had their personal data viewed by the FBI in its search for “racially motivated” extremists.

A senior FBI official told the Daily Mail that the FBI had taken ‘numerous steps’ to comply with the FISA court guidance over the past 18 months.

 

11. China cautions G7: 'small' groups don't rule the world

Reuters

Is China feeling pressure?

 

12. 2021 G7 Leaders' communiqué: Our shared agenda for global action to build back better

Consilum · June 13, 2021

The 25 page communique is at this link.

Per my previous comments about the information and influence campaign and the narrative: "Build back Better" is in the very title of the communique. It looks like some good work has been done by the diplomats and actions officers working on this.

The question is can B3W take on a major role in the narrative. B3W versus BRI? 

 

13. 'Xi Jinping is my spiritual leader': China's education drive in Tibet

Reuters · by Martin Pollard

Incredible indoctrination attempts.

Excerpts:Civilians and religious figures who the government arranged to be interviewed on the five-day trip pledged loyalty to the Communist Party and Xi.

Asked who his spiritual leader was, a monk at Lhasa's historic Jokhang temple named Xi.

"I'm not drunk ... I speak freely to you," said the monk named Lhakpa, speaking from a courtyard overlooked by security cameras and government observers.

The portraits of Xi were visible at almost all sites visited by Reuters during the trip to Tibet, where journalists are banned from entering outside of such tours. It was not clear when the posters and flags were put up.

"The posters coincide with a massive political education programme which is called 'feeling gratitude to the party' education," said Robert Barnett, a Tibetan studies veteran scholar at the University of London's School of Oriental and African Studies.

 

14. The US military is tearing itself apart over 'wokeness' and it's only helping America's enemies

taskandpurpose.com · by Jeff Schogol · June 12, 2021

 

15.  Biden’s Blue Dot seeks to derail China’s Belt and Road

asiatimes.com · by Richard Javad Heydarian · June 9, 2021

B3W appears to be derived from BDN (Blue Dot Network). Can we keep track of the acronyms (and we thought the. US military overused acronyms)

 

16. My Mother Eleni: The Search for her Executioners (published in 1983 about the Greek Civil War)

The New York Times · by Nicholas Gage · April 3, 1983

One of the great things about social media for me is when friends post interesting information and articles that I have missed or not come across. And we should be grateful to the NY Times archives. A friend posted this on Facebook and I think this is an interesting Sunday read about the tragedy of revolutions and resistance (in this case the Greek Civil War following WWII). This is the human domain of war and its long-term effects.

 

----------------

 

"It is by its promise of a sense of power that evil often attracts the weak."

- Eric Hoffer

 

“Second we find in our prerevolutionary society definite and indeed very bitter class antagonisms, though these antagonisms seem rather more complicated than the cruder Marxists will allow.”

- Crane Brinton

 

"First, I continue to think that people, with all their diverse identities, desires, and beliefs, should be central to our analyses of conflict. This means that individuals should be the prism through which to examine the effects of social structures, beliefs, and the possibilities for mobilization and political action. Is “relative deprivation” the best concept for doing so? In my own later writings I have used the words grievances and sense of injustice to capture the essence of the state of mind that motivates people to political action. Whichever phrase is used, the essential first step in any analysis is to understand what people’s grievances are and where they come from."

-Ted Gurr

DanielRiggs Sun, 06/13/2021 - 12:32pm
06/13/2021 News & Commentary – Korea

News & commentary by Dave Maxwell. Edited and published by Daniel Riggs

1. Top diplomats of S. Korea, U.S. reaffirm peninsula denuke goal, cooperation on vaccines, Myanmar

2.  As the Dust Settles, How Healthy is the ROK-US Alliance?

3. G7's rivalry with China complicates Korea's balancing act

4. Moon joins G-7 summit, vows financial support for global vaccine supply

5. Moon calls for global unity to strengthen open societies at G-7 summit

6.  Moon meets Suga at G-7, but bilateral session not in the cards

7. ‘Assassins,’ about death of N. Korea’s Kim Jong-nam, denied art film status

8. G-7 calls for 'complete' denuclearization of N. Korea, welcomes Washington's diplomacy towards Pyongyang: communique

9. North Korean Missiles Continue to Pose a Big Threat

10. Kim Jong-un health panic: North Korea regime could collapse - US intelligence on alert

 

1. Top diplomats of S. Korea, U.S. reaffirm peninsula denuke goal, cooperation on vaccines, Myanmar

en.yna.co.kr · by 송상호 · June 13, 2021

It does appear the ROK and US are working to operationalize and execute many of the agreements and initiatives announced in the summit. This is a positive trend.

 

2. As the Dust Settles, How Healthy is the ROK-US Alliance?

38north.org · by Sukjoon Yoon · June 11, 2021

A cautionary analysis. I am optimistic about the alliance but I think the problems with the north Korea agenda lie with Kim Jong-un though we have to recognize the difference in views between the ROK and US toward north Korea.

Conclusion: “For the present, the ROK-US alliance remains intact, but there is considerable uncertainty about its future. “There is an expanded vision for the Indo-Pacific Strategy, in which South Korea plays a bigger regional and global role, both in security terms and more generally.” But it is unclear whether, beyond rhetoric, any real-world changes will result. The summit also provided very little information on what the US and South Korea are actually going to do about North Korea’s growing nuclear and missile threats. Indeed, there are significant differences between Moon and Biden on how to deal with North Korea, with Moon still hoping to make short-term progress on the inter-Korean peace initiative and the US still putting the issue of denuclearization first. Despite the positive tone of the summit and Moon’s endorsement of the Biden administration’s new negotiating strategy, there were no indications of how to get the North Koreans back to the table.

While the summit joint statement will be presented as a win for both presidents, Moon has been obliged to tilt the South toward the United States’ policy on China, and to that extent, the Biden

 

3. G7's rivalry with China complicates Korea's balancing act

The Korea Times · by Kwon Mee-yoo · June 13, 2021

I know it gets old to read about the "shrimp among whales" analogy but this is just another example of how it aptly describes Korea's situation.

I wonder if B3W is going to catch on as an acronym. If it does then the G7 narrative will be competitive with the Chinese BRI or OBOR. I hope the supporting information and influence campaign from the GEC at State and NSC for the White House is in place and coordinated with the other members of the G7 and D10. If this is an important initiative and one the G7 and D10 plan to sincerely get behind we need to get the narrative right and dominate the information and influence space.

Excerpts: “Earlier on Saturday, the White House also announced the launch of the "Build Back Better World" (B3W) project, a global infrastructure plan aimed to provide infrastructure support to developing and emerging countries.

The White House said that the B3W project will mobilize private-sector capital in a "transparent infrastructure partnership" to provide support in four areas ― climate, health, digital technology and gender equity and equality ― for developing countries hit by the COVID-19 pandemic.

"B3W will be global in scope, from Latin America and the Caribbean, to Africa, to the Indo-Pacific. Different G7 partners will have different geographic orientations, but the sum of the initiative will cover low- and middle-income countries across the world," the White House said in a statement.

 

4. Moon joins G-7 summit, vows financial support for global vaccine supply

en.yna.co.kr · by 이치동 · June 13, 2021

South Korea has the opportunity to take the stage as a great middle power.

 

5. Moon calls for global unity to strengthen open societies at G-7 summit

en.yna.co.kr · by 이치동 · June 13, 2021

This can be viewed as a statement contrary to Chinese interests and could be interpreted that the ROK comes down on the side closer to the Quad and G7 than to China.

Excerpts:Moon briefed them on South Korea's experience in democratization and efforts to strengthen open societies, according to his office Cheong Wa Dae.

He emphasized the need for enhancing international collaboration to counter racialism, extremism and other threats to open societies as well as expanding free and fair trade and fostering an open economy.

He is scheduled to join another G-7 forum on "climate and nature" later in the day just before he wraps up his three-day stay in Cornwall, Britain. He is flying to Austria for a state visit, the second leg of his three-nation Europe tour that will also take him to Spain.”

 

6. Moon meets Suga at G-7, but bilateral session not in the cards

koreaherald.com · by Ahn Sung-mi · June 13, 2021

Interesting positioning of the world leaders in this photo.

 

7. ‘Assassins,’ about death of N. Korea’s Kim Jong-nam, denied art film status

m.koreaherald.com · by Kim Hae-yeon · June 10, 2021

Is this an attempt to appease north Korea?

 

8. G-7 calls for 'complete' denuclearization of N. Korea, welcomes Washington's diplomacy towards Pyongyang: communique

en.yna.co.kr · by 장동우 · June 13, 2021

It is good to see the G7 acknowledge this.

 

9. North Korean Missiles Continue to Pose a Big Threat

The National Interest · by Eli Fuhrman · June 11, 2021

Excerpt: "With its development of more capable ballistic missile systems, some have pointed to the possibility that North Korea is actively working to develop the ability to defeat U.S. ballistic missile defenses. Recently developed North Korean SRBMs have shown themselves to potentially be capable of evading such systems, while the possible development of a reliable SLBM could allow North Korea to circumvent some defenses. North Korea’s large recently unveiled ICBM, meanwhile, could eventually support multiple re-entry vehicles, which could pose a challenge to U.S. missile defenses."

 

10. Kim Jong-un health panic: North Korea regime could collapse - US intelligence on alert

Express · by Brian McGleenon · June 13, 2021

There is probably no one in the CFC C2 and the USFK J2 that recalls that most of the indicators of north Korean instability and regime collapse they are using are derived from Robert Collins, and his seminal work, Patterns of Collapse or the Seven Phases of north Korean regime collapse. The analysts (and the C2 and J2) would do well to pay attention to his work. There is no one who has studied this possible phenomena or knows more about how instability and regime collapse might emerge and unfold than Robert Collins. Many have written about this over the years at various times but all (me included) base their work on Robert Collins' research directly or if they do not directly they are drawing their writing on secondary sources that are based on his work that may or may not be acknowledged (I recall a briefing Bob gave to a defense official in the 1990s and a year later when the defense official left government he wrote about collapse. His work contained critical analysis produced by Bob and presented in that briefing and there was no acknowledgement). So the chances are that many so-called "experts" on instability and collapse have based much of their research on Bob's work, whether they know it or not.

 

----------------

 

"It is by its promise of a sense of power that evil often attracts the weak."

- Eric Hoffer

 

“Second we find in our prerevolutionary society definite and indeed very bitter class antagonisms, though these antagonisms seem rather more complicated than the cruder Marxists will allow.”

- Crane Brinton

 

"First, I continue to think that people, with all their diverse identities, desires, and beliefs, should be central to our analyses of conflict. This means that individuals should be the prism through which to examine the effects of social structures, beliefs, and the possibilities for mobilization and political action. Is “relative deprivation” the best concept for doing so? In my own later writings I have used the words grievances and sense of injustice to capture the essence of the state of mind that motivates people to political action. Whichever phrase is used, the essential first step in any analysis is to understand what people’s grievances are and where they come from."

-Ted Gurr

DanielRiggs Sun, 06/13/2021 - 12:14pm
06/12/2021 News & Commentary – National Security

News & commentary by Dave Maxwell. Edited and published by Daniel Riggs

1. "Prepare for War," China military warns in new propaganda poster for Taiwan

2. Was Taiwan Ever Really a Part of China?

3. Ex-Mossad director dismisses China threat, criticizing hardline U.S policy

4. China, US diplomats clash over human rights, pandemic origin

5.  China’s Censorship Widens to Hong Kong’s Vaunted Film Industry, With Global Implications

6. Why the China - Russia Relationship Should Worry You - Part One

7. Why the China – Russia Relationship Should Worry You – Part Two

8. ‘Tear Down This Wall’: The Power of Reagan’s 1987 Speech Endures

9. US Attache Disappointed at Curb on Navy Base Visit (Cambodia)

10. The Biden administration's investigation into COVID-19’s origins misses half of the problem

11.  Myanmar’s Coming Revolution: What Will Emerge From Collapse?

12. DOD Leaders Share Their Intelligence Threat Assessments

13. U.S. Presses China on New Covid-19 Study as Beijing Resists

14.  Top China Envoy Urges U.S. to Restore Normal Bilateral Ties

15. The US is scrambling to deal with cyberattacks, and that may mean new roles and missions for special-ops units

16. Racism didn’t exist in the military before Biden, US Senator says with straight face

17. Military Diversity: A Key American Strategic Asset

18. We Have Come a Long Ways … We Have a Ways to Go (Diversity in the Military)

19. What Do Conservatives Fear About Critical Race Theory?

 

1. "Prepare for War," China military warns in new propaganda poster for Taiwan

Newsweek · by John Feng · June 10, 2021

China's three warfares: psychological warfare, legal warfare, media warfare.

Is anyone advising Taiwan on its own psychological operations campaign and designing themes and messages? E.g.,  Taiwan will be a black hole for the PLA, One forces come ashore they will never leave and are never heard from again as they are absorbed by the terrain and resistance (hopefully the people of Taiwan will never be pacified).

 

2. Was Taiwan Ever Really a Part of China?

thediplomat.com · by Evan Dawley · June 10, 2021

Excerpts:All of these markers of separation were evident before 1947, when the divergence between Taiwanese and Chinese came into high relief during the 2-28 Uprising and its brutal suppression by Nationalist Chinese military forces, and the White Terror that began soon thereafter. Political opposition to the Nationalist Party and pro-independence sentiment went underground or overseas, but Taiwanese identities intensified. Although sharp divisions continued to exist between indigenous and non-indigenous populations, by the 1990s many defined “Taiwanese” to include both groups. Decades of single-party rule under martial law by Chiang Kai-shek’s regime did not effectively instill most of Taiwan’s residents with a new sense of Chinese national identity. Indeed, most of the roughly 1 million people who left China for Taiwan, and their descendants, came to identify themselves with Taiwan, not China.

The ROC nevertheless successfully continued Taiwan’s condition of political separation from China, a fact that has been in existence now for almost all of the past 126 years, and it has maintained full sovereignty for about seven decades. Chinese insistence on the idea of Taiwan as a part of China has failed to convince the roughly 23 million Taiwanese.

As Cena’s apology shows, Chinese views have been much more effective in shaping international opinion, but they do not change Taiwan’s modern history or the reality that Taiwan is a country. Individuals, countries, and companies can make their own choices about how to interact with China and its citizens, but they should do so with an accurate understanding of the underlying history.

 

3. Ex-Mossad director dismisses China threat, criticizing hardline U.S policy

Axios · by Barak Ravid

We should not over-hype threats but we should not "over"-downplay them either.

But this is an important critique:

“If there is anybody here who knows what the U.S. wants from China, I would be happy to hear. I am not sure we fully understand if there is a coherent U.S. policy on China."

— Yossi Cohen

I would ask, what is the acceptable, durable political arrangement we would like to see in Asia that will protect, sustain, and advance US interests?

 

4. China, US diplomats clash over human rights, pandemic origin

AP

Excerpts:Relations between them have deteriorated to their lowest level in decades, with the Biden administration showing no signs of deviating from the established U.S. hardline against China over trade, technology, human rights and China’s claim to the South China Sea.

Beijing, meanwhile, has fought back doggedly against what it sees as attempts to smear its reputation and restrain its development.

On Thursday, its ceremonial legislature passed a law to retaliate against sanctions imposed on Chinese politicians and organizations, threatening to deny entry to and freeze the Chinese assets of anyone who formulates or implements such measures, potentially placing new pressure on foreign companies operating in the country.

 

5.  China’s Censorship Widens to Hong Kong’s Vaunted Film Industry, With Global Implications

The New York Times · by Raymond Zhong · June 11, 2021

Three warfares... combination of legal warfare and media warfare?

Excerpts:The new guidelines, which apply to both domestically produced and foreign films, come as a sharp slap to the artistic spirit of Hong Kong, where government-protected freedoms of expression and an irreverent local culture had imbued the city with a cultural vibrancy that set it apart from mainland megacities.

They also represent a broadening of the Chinese government’s hold on the global film industry. China’s booming box office has been irresistible to Hollywood studios. Big-budget productions go to great lengths to avoid offending Chinese audiences and Communist Party censors, while others discover the expensive way what happens when they do not.

...

Censorship worries have loomed large over Hong Kong’s creative industries ever since the former British colony was returned to China in 1997. But concerns that once felt theoretical have become frighteningly real since Beijing enacted a national security law last year to quash the antigovernment protests that shook the city in 2019.

So while few in the local movie industry said they felt caught totally off guard by the new censorship guidelines issued Friday, they still expressed concern that the sweeping scope of the rules would affect not just which movies are screened in Hong Kong, but also how they get produced and whether they get made at all.

...

China has become more important to Hollywood in recent years because it is one of the few countries where moviegoing is growing. Ticket sales in the United States and Canada, which make up the world’s No. 1 movie market, were flat between 2016 and 2019, at $11.4 billion, according to the Motion Picture Association. Over that period, ticket sales in China increased 41 percent, to $9.3 billion.

As a result, American studios have stepped up their efforts to work within China’s censorship system.

Last year, PEN America, the free-speech advocacy group, excoriated Hollywood executives for voluntarily censoring films to placate China, with “content, casting, plot, dialogue and settings” tailored “to avoid antagonizing Chinese officials.” In some instances, PEN said, studios have been “directly inviting Chinese government censors onto their film sets to advise them on how to avoid tripping the censors’ wires.”

 

6. Why the China - Russia Relationship Should Worry You - Part One

thecipherbrief.com · by Mark Kelton · June 8, 2021

Conclusion: "Both Beijing and Moscow seem to have come to the realization that there is little the West can do using traditional means to dissuade them from their espionage activities. It is now apparent that declaring intelligence officers persona non-grata, issuing arrest warrants for those involved in espionage and imposing sanctions against governments or persons responsible for those operations appreciably alter neither Russian nor Chinese behavior. There is, therefore, no easy or formulaic riposte to the espionage threats this duo pose. We can, and should, step up our counterintelligence programs; intensify efforts to clandestinely penetrate their intelligence and decision-making circles; and harden our cyber defenses (to include increased information sharing on threats between government and industry). We should not, however, expect that such steps alone will deter this pair’s spying. This is particularly true of Chinese espionage given the impunity with which the PRC is waging economic war against us. Yet, we must to do all we can to protect American industrial know-how and supply chains from Beijing’s depredations. To that end, we need to consider more aggressive use of sanctions against our real Chinese adversary – the CCP, its officials and organizations – as well as other PRC institutions and companies directing, facilitating, or benefiting competitively from such spying. And we should do so even at the risk of PRC retaliation against US companies and officials. Some will argue that this will hasten the economic decoupling of the US from China. So be it. The policy of engagement as a means of altering Beijing’s behavior has long since been proven a chimera. And with Xi himself arguing against decoupling, it is probably wise to try to do just that where feasible in order to protect our crucial industries and supply chains."

 

7. Why the China – Russia Relationship Should Worry You – Part Two

Cipher Brief · by Mark Kelton · June 9, 2021

Conclusion: "This is a profoundly dangerous moment for our country.  Any perception of US weakness can translate into peril as the two autocrats consider their next move. President Biden has identified competition with China as his administration’s greatest foreign policy challenge, pledging to maintain a strong U.S. military presence in the Indo-Pacific and to boost U.S. technological development. Whether the US will win what President Biden termed “a battle between the utility of democracies in the 21st century and autocracies” will not, however, only be decided economic power and military force. Victory in that conflict will also be determined by the ability of the US to unify around, and demonstrate national will in defending, its founding principles in the face of those embodying their antitheses. “I think”, Churchill wrote to Lloyd George just before the 1938 Munich Conference, “we shall have to choose in the next few weeks between war and shame, and I have little doubt what that decision will be.”[2] Churchill was sadly proven correct as a lack of sufficient resolve in confronting the aggressors of his day propelled the world further along the road to global cataclysm. American failure to stand athwart the designs of today’s infernal twins – even at the risk of war – will garner similar ignominy and likewise may well end in a war that might have been avoided or limited had we acted with greater resolution earlier."

 

8.  ‘Tear Down This Wall’: The Power of Reagan’s 1987 Speech Endures

National Review Online · by H. R. McMaster · June 12, 2021

Excerpts:Reagan used the physical wall to illuminate the stark contrast between two systems, leaving little room for moral equivalence. He described the wall and the border complex that comprised the Iron Curtain as an “instrument to impose upon ordinary men and women the will of a totalitarian state” and observed that the “news photo and the television screen have imprinted this brutal division of a continent upon the mind of the world.” He made that barrier and the oppression it represented important to all people. “Standing before the Brandenburg Gate, every man is a German, separated from his fellow men. Every man is a Berliner, forced to look upon a scar.” Sadly, after Berliners tore down the wall in November 1989, man-made barriers that divide free and oppressed peoples persisted, such as the fences, minefields, and guard towers that run along the 38th parallel and separate South Korea’s thriving democracy from the Kim family’s destitute dictatorship.

But it is the 180-kilometer-long strait that connects the East China Sea and the South China Sea that marks the most consequential political obstacle between peoples who share a common culture — much as the Berlin Wall did during the Cold War. Taiwanese appear as today’s West Berliners because Taiwan’s successful democracy exposes the CCP’s lie that the Chinese people are culturally predisposed toward not wanting a say in how they are governed. Reagan expressed respect for Berliners in 1987, noting “the feeling of history in this city, more than 500 years older than our own nation.” Leaders across the free world today might show respect for the Taiwanese and all Chinese people by acknowledging that China’s recent history — from the Republican Revolution of 1911 to the Tiananmen Square massacre of 1989 to the Hong Kong protests of 2020 — reveals the CCP’s Leninist system as unnatural and sustainable only through oppression. Like West Berlin during the Cold War, Taiwan’s vibrancy and openness can provide hope to those who, from Xinjiang to Hong Kong to Tibet to Beijing, might otherwise despair. The Taiwanese people need, as West Berliners did during the Cold War, the support of the free world to counter the CCP’s aggression and deter conflict at a dangerous flashpoint that could lead to a devastating war.

Reagan delivered a confident, positive message. It has been largely forgotten that many in the West extolled the relative strengths of Soviet communism up to the moment that the system collapsed. Reagan, however, saw the competitive advantages of America and the free world. He declared that “there stands before the entire world one great and inescapable conclusion: Freedom leads to prosperity. Freedom replaces the ancient hatreds among the nations with comity and peace. Freedom is the victor.” Across the world’s democracies, in today’s season of self-doubt brought on by the aforementioned traumas, Reagan’s speech provides a reminder that self-respect is foundational to the competition with the CCP. The free world has a competitive advantage in unalienable rights: freedom of expression, of assembly, and of the press; freedom of religion and freedom from persecution based on religion, race, gender, or sexual orientation; the freedom to prosper in our free-market economic system; rule of law and the protections it affords to life and liberty; and democratic governance that recognizes that government serves the people rather than the other way around. While the free world’s democratic governments and free-market economic systems are imperfect and require constant nurturing, those who extol the relative strengths of China’s system and argue that the best that democracies can do is to manage their relative decline may one day find themselves as surprised as Soviet advocates and apologists were in 1989.

...

The Berlin speech and other Reagan speeches that addressed the Cold War competition with the Soviet Union, such as the Westminster Address of June 1982 and the “Evil Empire” speech given at the annual convention of the National Association of Evangelicals in Orlando, Fla., in March 1983, explained what was at stake, for the United States and humanity, in the competition with the Soviet Union. In the latter speech, he lamented the “historical reluctance to see totalitarian powers for what they are.” That reluctance abides, as some argue that, in the competition with the Chinese Communist Party, the United States faces a binary choice between accommodation and a disastrous war. Others prioritize profits over principles as they surrender to the Party’s coercive power. Some rationalize their silence over heinous human-rights abuses with tortured arguments of moral equivalence. President Ronald Reagan’s Berlin speech demonstrated that direct language is itself an essential element of effective competition. The speech retains its importance because it demonstrates the need for an unambiguous understanding of the nature of today’s competition with the CCP, reveals how that understanding can help restore confidence in and gratitude for democratic governance, and encourages a renewed international commitment to the unalienable rights to which all peoples are entitled.

 

9. US Attache Disappointed at Curb on Navy Base Visit (Cambodia)

cambodianess.com · by Phoung Vantha· June 12, 2021

Chinese influence?

 

10. The Biden administration's investigation into COVID-19’s origins misses half of the problem

Washington Examiner · by Anthony Ruggiero · June 11, 2021

Excerpts: “Now that the WHO meeting has finished, Biden or Becerra should publicly detail what the next steps are. China is not cooperating with the investigation; what is the Biden administration’s plan? Will it study the issue for 90 days while Beijing’s obstruction continues?

A better approach is for Biden to assemble a public-private investigation with like-minded countries that reviews available information and provides a judgment on the likely scenarios.

China’s cover-up cost the lives of nearly 600,000 people in America, and over 33 million have been infected. The country deserves concrete answers immediately. It’s time for the Biden administration to switch from rhetoric to action.

 

11. Myanmar’s Coming Revolution: What Will Emerge From Collapse?

Foreign Affairs · June 11, 2021

I hope we are in close contact with the handful of Americans who have built long term relationships in Burma and are advising and assisting indigenous forces. They certainly have information, insights, and intelligence that can be crucial to effective policy making and strategic planning. And of course some are prepared to serve as pilot teams should there be a decision to act on some scale (most likely directly or through proxies).

Excerpts:These new guerilla movements can certainly keep the junta off balance. But the insurrectionists will not be able to build a new army to challenge the existing one without significant help from a neighboring country, which seems next to impossible. And nothing in the history of Myanmar’s army suggests that a sizable chunk of its forces would break away and join a rebellion. That leaves the ethnic minority armies as the only other possible agents of a broader uprising. The Kachin Independence Army and the Karen National Liberation Army, in the far north and southeast of the country, respectively, have already mounted new attacks on army positions. Other groups, too, may move from statements of political support to armed action. But even the combined might of the ethnic armed organizations—numbering perhaps 75,000 fighters in total—would be no match for a military that has far superior artillery and a monopoly on airpower. Moreover, the most powerful ethnic armed organization, the United Wa State Army, with 30,000 troops, has deep links to China, having emerged from the old communist insurgency. It will heed the advice of Beijing, which has no love for the Myanmar army but does not want to see an all-out civil war.

...

Second, outside powers must support and encourage all those working not only for democracy in Myanmar but also for the broad transformation of Myanmar politics and society. That includes serious efforts, possibly through an expanded UN civilian presence in Myanmar, to monitor human rights abuses and negotiate the release of political prisoners. It is critical, however, not to raise false hopes by offering people in Myanmar the chimera of international salvation; that would only steer energy away from building the necessary and broadest possible coalitions at home.

Third, outside help needs to be based on an appreciation of Myanmar’s unique history, one in which past army regimes have withstood the strictest international isolation, and the unique psychology of the generals themselves, molded by decades of unrelenting violence. The international community’s usual carrots and sticks won’t work.

Fourth, foreign governments should assist poor and vulnerable populations as much as possible, perhaps focusing initially on providing COVID-19 vaccinations. But such assistance must be handled with tremendous political skill and designed in collaboration with health-care workers themselves, so as not to inadvertently entrench the grip of the junta. Many of the junta’s opponents have wanted to crash the economy to help trigger revolution, but as weeks stretch into months and years, it will be necessary to protect the civilian economy as much as possible, to prevent a worsening humanitarian disaster. Responsible global firms that do not do business with the army should be encouraged to stay in the country. A population that is healthy and well fed is one that will be better able to push for political change.

Governments must try different initiatives with as much flexibility and international coordination as possible. There is no magic bullet, no single set of policies that will solve the crisis in Myanmar. That’s because the crisis isn’t just the result of the February coup; it is the outcome of decades of failed state building and nation building and an economy and a society that have been so unjust for so long to so many. The outside world has long tended to see Myanmar as a fairy tale, shorn of its complexities, in which an agreeable ending is just around the corner. The fairy tale must now end and be replaced with serious diplomacy and well-informed, practical strategies. With this, there is every chance that over a few years—not magically overnight—Myanmar can become the peaceful democracy so clearly desired by its people.

 

12. DOD Leaders Share Their Intelligence Threat Assessments

defense.gov · by David Vergun

Excerpts: “The expansion of the competitive space beyond traditional military domains and geographic boundaries increases and complicates demands for defense intelligence, collection, analysis and planning, he said.

Challenges from strategic competitors such as Russia and China, rogue states such as Iran and North Korean, and violent extremists require that the defense intelligence enterprise invest in the ability to seamlessly share and fuse information, synchronize capabilities and expand partnerships with other government agencies, the private sector, academia and partner nations, he said.

The department is taking a whole-of-government approach, which includes reviewing classification processes, pursuing wider dissemination of classified information through alliances and partnerships, and the thoughtful release to the public of certain unclassified information to support U.S. interests, Moultrie said.

The department is focused on countering insider threats through better vetting procedures and protecting its vital supply chain, he said.

 

13.  U.S. Presses China on New Covid-19 Study as Beijing Resists

Bloomberg · June 11, 2021

 

14. Top China Envoy Urges U.S. to Restore Normal Bilateral Ties

Bloomberg  · Charlie Zhu

Excerpts: “Beijing officials have repeatedly denied that the virus leaked from the lab, and pointed to a WHO report earlier this year that said the most likely origin was natural.

Yang also urged the U.S. not to use human rights issues to interfere with internal politics in other countries. Top diplomats from the G-7 called last month for China to respect human rights and fundamental freedoms, condemning Beijing’s treatment of its Uyghur minority over forced labor and compelled sterilization. Beijing rejects accusations that human rights abuses are being committed in Xinjiang.

 

15. The US is scrambling to deal with cyberattacks, and that may mean new roles and missions for special-ops units

Business Insider · by Stavros Atlamazoglou

Excerpts:The Pentagon and the Intelligence Community have differing aims for cyber operations, and inside the military there are varying capabilities and goals — mainly those of US Cyber Command and US Special Operations Command — in that domain.

Those divides underline the absence of a broader cyber strategy.

The US special-operations community has been paying more attention to the cyber domain, which offers the community an opportunity to understand an adversary, find its weaknesses, and use them against it.

American commandos have already used these capabilities to fight ISIS. In the age of great-power competition with more sophisticated adversaries, like China and Russia, US commandos deployed to study Chinese capabilities or to track Russian influence operations can also take advantage of those capabilities.

"Not only does SOF have an interest in more cyber, but they have made it known they plan on significantly increasing their investment in cyber- and electronic-warfare capabilities," Herm Hasken, a partner and senior operations consultant at MarkPoint Technologies, told Insider.

For Special Operations Command and Joint Special Operations Command, that investment is reflected in the National Defense Authorization Act, an annual bill that funds defense and national-security programs.

...

In addition to offensive operations, the US special-operations community is flexible and can use cyber to gain an advantage against adversaries in more traditional missions.

For example, Special Operations Command's Army Special Forces, Civil Affairs, and Psychological Operations units can use cyber operations to better understand the local populations they work with and to influence their views of the US. Information gathered through cyber operations can also be used to improve US training of foreign partner forces.

Conversely, Cyber Command is more interested in knowing where an adversary's communications networks are and how to take them out. In the absence of a broader US cyber strategy, such a capability is wasted, as it's reserved for combat operations.

...

As people give more devices more access to their daily lives — whether through online banking or internet-enabled appliances — cybersecurity takes on more importance for ordinary citizens, and demand for private-sector cybersecurity services is growing is growing.

Companies like SMU — which is led by former special-operations and intelligence professionals who specialize in individual online privacy and cybersecurity — are becoming the go-to choice.

"There's no longer a need to wait for the NSA or FBI or DHS to put out a bulletin warning individual citizens of the risks of cybercrime," an expert at the Signature Management Unit, one of those firms, told Insider.

The increasing potential for cyber operations by a nation-state or a criminal group to affect the public has raised the stakes for those families and businesses, according to the SMU expert, who has joint special operations and intelligence experience and spoke anonymously to discuss the firm's projects.

"While we invest a lot in national cyber and the cybersecurity infrastructure protection, this is not a replacement for individual responsibility," the SMU expert said.

 

16.  Racism didn’t exist in the military before Biden, US Senator says with straight face

taskandpurpose.com · by Jeff Schogol · June 11, 2021

Senator Cotton and Rep. Crenshaw undermine their own legitimacy with their statements. And the treatment of Secretary Austin for political theater is unbecoming.

And those who call for the ban against ideas and theories ought to rethink their understanding of the Constitution and American ideals and values. If you have to ban an idea or theory it must mean you cannot present an equal better alternative and allow people to think for themselves and determine what they choose to believe and accept. Do they really think they can legislate their way to ensure people think the way they do and accept their version of political correctness?

 

17. Military Diversity: A Key American Strategic Asset

armyupress.army.mil

Worth reading from one of our four star generals. Compare this to the article on our "woke military" published under the pseudonym Robert Berg here:  I take General Garrett's side even as I acknowledge Mr. Berg's right to hold and express his ideas.

Excerpts: “A diverse and inclusive force helps young Americans, families, and veterans trust and relate to the U.S. Army. Outside of recruiting and talent management, the Army is also a symbol of our Nation’s values—a source of pride for the American conscience and our partners. A recent Reagan Foundation survey found that Americans’ trust in the U.S. military has declined since 2018, though it is still above the public’s trust in six other public institutions.25 In the wake of a divisive 2020 marked by racial tension and conflict, the military can and should be a source of national unity.

A diverse and inclusive force represents American values abroad. In 1997, a Bolivian army corporal named Rodrigo Mendoza trained alongside soldiers from 7th Special Forces Group (Airborne) during a training exchange in his own country.26 Inspired by this experience, Mendoza completed his mandatory national military service, moved to Puerto Rico, enlisted in the 82nd Airborne Division, gained U.S. citizenship, and eventually earned a Special Forces green beret of his own. Every day, diverse and cohesive teams of soldiers across the world represent the democratic values that make America strong. And while these exchanges are meant to build partner capacity, not recruit foreign citizens, Mendoza’s story demonstrates the reach and impact of American values. Without this reach, we would not only lose influence abroad but also present adversaries with opportunities to undermine our Nation’s credibility.

As an organization that has declared “People First!,” we have an obligation to follow through on this promise by ensuring respect and decency across our formations.27 And ultimately, a diverse Army will attract the best of America’s next generation when they see themselves in the chain of command and know they have equal opportunities to lead and advance.

Leaders who look at the Army’s top priority, “People First!,” in a strategic context are well-prepared to balance “people” and “readiness” in their units. Specifically, diversity and inclusion within the military are vital strategic assets that keep our force strong and set our Nation apart on the global stage. However—beyond strategy—diversity, inclusion, tolerance, respect, and fair opportunities are essential rights for all people. Leaders who disagree with the idea that diversity is a strategic asset have no less responsibility to ensure inclusion at their level. It is their legal and ethical responsibility.

This article’s strategic context is a new way for leaders to think about diversity, but at the end of the day, these justifications are not the reason the U.S. Army takes care of its people. We take care of our people because it is right, because we care, and because they deserve it.

The Army is fortunate to have leaders who have the heart to take care of people today and the perspective to understand the long-term impacts of unit culture on military readiness.

 

18. We Have Come a Long Ways … We Have a Ways to Go (Diversity in the Military)

armyupress.army.mil

Perhaps someone could ensure Senator Cotton and Representative Cresnhaw could receive a copy of this article. Maybe someone in the Army OCLL can deliver a copy to them. It might help them be better informed on issues of race and diversity and to understand it existed in our Army before January 20, 2021.

This sums up the discussions I often observe: “After answering this question, the follow-on conversation typically is reflective of the person’s race. Black friends and associates spend more time trying to convince me that “we have a very long way to go” as they focus on the glass that is half empty: personal encounters with racism or bias, discrimination, or statistics tied to selection rates for battalion and brigade command or senior service college. My White coworkers or lifetime friends reflect on legal and cultural changes since the 1960s and believe that the Army “has come a very long way” in embracing Black Americans. Can both voices be right?

 

19. What Do Conservatives Fear About Critical Race Theory?

The New Yorker · by Benjamin Wallace-Wells · June 10, 2021

The use of legislation to ban ideas with which you disagree is anathema to American values. And the very act of trying to do so is an admission that you cannot intellectually compete with the ideas with which you disagree.

That said this conclusion really gets to one important aspect of this entire issue and something both sides of this issue should reflect upon:That is reason to think that the conflict over critical race theory might endure, even when the attention of Fox News inevitably drifts. The question of what children are held responsible for cuts deep, and the answer isn’t always determined by a person’s ideology or partisan identity. When I spoke with Terry Stoops, a conservative education-policy expert at the John Locke Foundation who had been appointed to a task force on “indoctrination” in public schools by the conservative lieutenant governor of North Carolina, he told me that he wasn’t sure how long the outrage of some grassroots conservatives would ultimately last. But he did think their anger had been misunderstood. “I’ve seen so much discussion about the fact that conservatives are advancing these critical-race-theory bills because they don’t want the truth of slavery or racism to be taught, and I haven’t seen that at all. I think parents want their children to learn about the mistakes of the past in order to create a better future,” Stoops said. “They don’t want their children to be told that they are responsible for the mistakes of their ancestors, and that unless they repent for those mistakes then they will remain complicit.” The debate isn’t about history, exactly. It is about the possibility of blamelessness.

 

----------------

 

“If it is not right, do not do it, if it is not true, do not say it.” 

– Marcus Aurelius

 

“That’s why the philosophers warn us not to be satisfied with mere learning, but to add practice and then training. For as time passes we forget what we learned and end up doing the opposite, and hold opinions the opposite of what we should.” 

– Epictetus

 

“What man actually needs is not a tensionless state but rather the striving and struggling for some goal worthy of him.” 

– Viktor Frankl

DanielRiggs Sat, 06/12/2021 - 2:40pm

06/12/2021 News & Commentary – Korea

Sat, 06/12/2021 - 2:19pm

News & commentary by Dave Maxwell. Edited and published by Daniel Riggs.

1. N.K. leader presides over Central Military Commission meeting, calls for 'high alert posture'

2. In tense phone call, Chinese Foreign Minister warns Seoul not to take U.S. side

3. South Korea Can Now Build Missiles Able to Reach Beijing, With U.S. Blessing

4. N.Korea's Kim calls for boosting military power

5. DPRK leader chairs military meeting to enhance army's fighting efficiency

6. Kim Jong Un's weight loss sparks debate among North Korea watchers about leader's grip on power

7. South Korean conservatives overtake ruling party amid major political shifts

8. Across the North Korean Border in China, an Economic Winter That Never Ends

9. Hamhung man arrested for corruption while working at a state-run department store

10. Seoul should stay unaffected by Beijing to gain ‘D10 membership’

11. Blinken stresses need to work together on N. Korea in call with Chinese counterpart

12. U.S. to redirect nearly US$70 mln to USFK from border wall project

13. Moon meets AstraZeneca's CEO to discuss vaccine cooperation

14. North Korea Preaches Self-Reliance to Struggling Citizens

 

1.  N.K. leader presides over Central Military Commission meeting, calls for 'high alert posture'

en.yna.co.kr · by 이원주 · June 12, 2021

Is this just rhetoric or for internal message purposes? Does it also indicate what Bob Collins would call an externalization of its internal problems meaning it is preparing for some kind of external action to raise tensions or conduct a provocation that will remind the Korean people in the north that the regime faces external existential threats and therefore the people will have to continue to sacrifice for the defense of the regime and the protection of Kim Jong-un. Kim is setting the conditions for some kind of potential action in the near future.

Think about this graphic from Bob from the 1990s (with a light update from "il" to "un.") It remains relevant. 

2. In tense phone call, Chinese Foreign Minister warns Seoul not to take U.S. side

onekoreanetwork.com · June 11, 2021

Hopefully Chinese wolf diplomacy will have blowback for the Chinese leadership. South Korea should not accept being threatened.

 

3. South Korea Can Now Build Missiles Able to Reach Beijing, With U.S. Blessing

WSJ · by Andrew Jeong

Of course this upsets Beijing. And we should remember geographically Beijing is closer to Seoul than Seoul is to Tokyo.

 

4. N.Korea's Kim calls for boosting military power

Reuters 

Is Kim telegraphing an increase in tension and possible provocation? Is he preparing the population for something? Without a doubt it is to ensure that external factors can be blamed for his incompetence in policy making and leadership.

 

5. DPRK leader chairs military meeting to enhance army's fighting efficiency

xinhuanet.com

A Chinese view of Kim's "military meeting."

 

6. Kim Jong Un's weight loss sparks debate among North Korea watchers about leader's grip on power

ABC.net.au · June 11, 2021

I think there will be a bit of speculation in the coming weeks and months about Kim's health and future.

 

7. South Korean conservatives overtake ruling party amid major political shifts

onekoreanetwork.com · June 11, 2021

It seems like presidential election politics is getting an early start. Probably the unfortunate influence of US politics. 

 

8. Across the North Korean Border in China, an Economic Winter That Never Ends

Foreign Policy · by Tang Yuan · June 11, 2021

This is a result of Kim Jong-un's deliberate policy decisions.

Excerpts:For over 20 years, the plant has spewed clouds of thick, white dust over the surrounding countryside, residents of the nearby Xiajiefang village say. The emissions from the riverside plant—which they nickname “Goryeo Dust” after the name of an old Korean kingdom—will often travel across the Yalu and cover their clothes and crops. “It chokes you,” said Xia Yunfang, 59. “Almost like it is snowing,” added Xia’s husband, Xu Chuanzhong. The couple grows grapes, a local specialty, but complain that when they’re plastered in cement dust they cannot be sold at a good price.

A cross-border trader from Jian, who requested anonymity because of the sensitive nature of his business dealings, thought he had a solution. In 2016, he signed a contract with Manpho to upgrade the cement factory so it would be both more efficient and less polluting. In return, the trader would be paid back in timber, minerals, and cement. But when the U.N. sanctions came into effect in 2018 and disrupted shipments of equipment, the project was only halfway done. The project was suspended ahead of completion, with the trader only compensated for about 3 million yuan ($470,000) of his initial 9 million yuan ($1.4 million) outlay, money he said might be wasted.

In mid-May, the chimneys across the river were still discharging heavy fumes—although they can’t compare with the smoke captured in videos from earlier years that villagers had uploaded to social media. Locals say that, though the project is unfinished, it seems to have helped lower pollution levels. But there’s no way to know for sure. Perhaps the wind just hasn’t been blowing in their direction, they say. The trader, meanwhile, thinks prospects for completing the refurbishments are dim, as the North Korean officials he had established relations with have since changed posts.

Despite increasing signs of a border reopening, the trader is wary of putting too much stock in them, pointing to recent COVID-19 cases in Liaoning province. “They open the door a bit wider if the outside is safe, and if it is not, they will immediately close the door again,” he said. “We’ll wait.”

 

9. Hamhung man arrested for corruption while working at a state-run department store

dailynk.com · Lee Sang Yang · June 11, 2021

Corruption permeates every aspect of north Korean society.

 

10. Seoul should stay unaffected by Beijing to gain ‘D10 membership’

donga.com · June 12, 2021

The territory on the "Go" (or paduk) board is being arranged.

Conclusion: "It is highly likely that U.S. President Joe Biden will make a sophisticated effort to build a front against China during the meeting where he makes an official multilateral diplomatic debut. China may come under condemnation for suppressing human rights, abusing diplomatic influence and engaging in unfair trade. The gist of the U.S.-led Summit for Democracy in the second half of this year and the Britain-proposed D10 Initiative is to solidify international coalition to safeguard democracy and human rights. If South Korea keeps standing on the sidelines without adding a voice to their chants and steps back being intimidated by China's warning it not to be swept by a biased force, it may not be able to secure any seat in the international community."

 

11. Blinken stresses need to work together on N. Korea in call with Chinese counterpart

en.yna.co.kr · by 변덕근 · June 12, 2021

Yes, we must try to have some kind of cooperation with China on north Korea. But we should be under no illusion that China will ever sincerely help us solve our security problems and both China and the DPRK can be expected to exploit the situation as spoilers at the time it makes sense to them to do so.

 

12.  U.S. to redirect nearly US$70 mln to USFK from border wall project

en.yna.co.kr · by 변덕근 · June 12, 2021

 

13.  Moon meets AstraZeneca's CEO to discuss vaccine cooperation

en.yna.co.kr · by 이치동 · June 12, 2021

 

14. North Korea Preaches Self-Reliance to Struggling Citizens

rfa.org  by Jeong Yon Park

You cannot eat ideology or self reliance. There is no nutritional value in Juche.

The paradox of north Korea is that the most self-reliant among the population are those who operate and use the markets but the regime policies are hindering market activity in an effort to oppress the people to maintain control over them to ensure regime survival.

 

----------------

 

“If it is not right, do not do it, if it is not true, do not say it.” 

– Marcus Aurelius

 

“That’s why the philosophers warn us not to be satisfied with mere learning, but to add practice and then training. For as time passes we forget what we learned and end up doing the opposite, and hold opinions the opposite of what we should.” 

– Epictetus

 

“What man actually needs is not a tensionless state but rather the striving and struggling for some goal worthy of him.” 

– Viktor Frankl