Small Wars Journal

The Pentagon Wants to Know How a Border Wall Will Improve Troops’ ‘Effectiveness’ Before it Contributes DoD Dollars

The Pentagon Wants to Know How a Border Wall Will Improve Troops’ ‘Effectiveness’ Before it Contributes DoD Dollars by Tara Copp and Leo Shane III - Military Times

The Pentagon has asked Department of Homeland Security to identify locations where border wall construction would improve the “effectiveness" of military troops deployed there, a key justification required to redirect military construction spending that would otherwise go to local base projects.

 

In a memo, dated Feb. 18, DoD asked DHS to identify “priorities for potential construction,” a U.S. official familiar with the memo’s contents told Military Times. Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan is asking for a priority list, as well as the data used to generate that priority list, to help him determine “what projects we support” and what could be delayed, the official said.

 

The Pentagon is looking at how it could spend military construction funds, or MILCON, to comply with President Donald Trump’s declaration of a national emergency last week. Shanahan has not received a response yet from DHS, the official said.

 

Congressional staffers also said they have not received any specifics from the White House on how military construction money will be used in the border wall effort…

Read on.

Comments

From the beginning of our article above:

"The Pentagon has asked Department of Homeland Security to identify locations where border wall construction would improve the “effectiveness" of military troops deployed there, a key justification required to redirect military construction spending that would otherwise go to local base projects. ...

The use of military construction funds is a political hot button. Most of those projects are the result of military communities’ elected officials lobbying — sometimes for years — for new buildings, gyms and housing that are viewed as critical quality-of-life projects. They are also sometimes seen as insulation against base closure."

Wow. 

This seems to put subnational entities (for example, American cities and states) in a very difficult "fish" (protect American culture) or "cut bait" (protect your military bases) position.

Here is one of these such subnational "fish"/"protect American culture" arguments and (b) how the U.S. Supreme Court is beginning to rule (a) against same and (b) more in favor of additional immigration (considered necessary so as to advance American economic competitiveness): 

BEGIN QUOTE

Like (Samual P.) Huntington, he (Patrick Buchanan) argues that, because Mexicans fail to assimilate into American culture and instead retain their language and culture, America will cease to be one nation. He calls for a halt to Mexican immigration and for the deportation and repatriation of Mexicans and the construction of a “permanent fence” along the United States/Mexico border.

In response to such concerns, various state and local governments have sought to regulate immigration. For instance, the Cities of Irving and Farmer’s Branch in north Texas, and the State of Oklahoma, have initiated programs to crack down on illegal immigrants. Their programs seem to be driven by a concern to protect American culture from the influx of Latino immigrants. ...

Subnational efforts to regulate immigration also represent an effort to impose a moral judgment on the cross border immigrant labor market. This is the case because these efforts are based on the longstanding perception that the culture of the immigrants―Latino culture―is inferior to the dominant Anglo culture. This Latino culture has been vilified and under siege for years and such ill treatment continues into the present day. The emerging market state and the Supreme Court’s new approach in Garamendi will not or does not permit sub-national entities to impose their moral judgments regarding culture on the international market. Thus, such regulation should fall by the wayside as the market state emerges.

END QUOTE 

(Items in parenthesis above are mine.)

https://digitalcommons.wcl.american.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=https://www.google.com/&httpsredir=1&article=1495&context=jgspl

(Note:  This entire document, published back in 2010, makes very interesting reading; especially today.)