The Qods Force is responsible for bolstering Hezbollah over thirty years ago and they have been working together across the globe ever since.

The Abu Bakr al Baghdadi Gang has “gone to war” with the civilized world – using spectacular slaughter to political ends. The civilized powers must respond...

The current context of the Middle East demands complex multifaceted strategies that merge hard, soft and smart power.

As the militaries improve their ability to conduct operations, the next logical step is to ensure they can interoperate with U.S. and other allied nations.

The Levant increasingly appears a place where anarchy might be the only order of the day unless a number of anti-ISIS actors come up with a plan to destroy that entity.

As a western ally with a predominantly Sunni population, Turkey’s geostrategic importance and ideological role is critical in tempering the rise of Islamic extremism....

Fire in the Lake, a political-military board game of the Vietnam War, is the latest...

Small Wars Journal interview with Dr. Russell W. Glenn, associate professor with the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, The Australian National University.

America’s approach to the threat of global terror has been one dimensional and strategically ineffective.

Frankly, it might be a good idea not to drop bombs on oil trucks with drivers inside.  However wise it may be, it is not legally required.

Because of the pace of technological change, failing to recognize today’s shifting security environment is perhaps understandable. 

The driving storyline of extremist Islam, often referred to simply as the Narrative, states that the West and its allies are continuing in a historical effort to destroy...

A proper application of Clausewitz’s Center of Gravity provides the framework for an anti-ISIS strategy.

If the Army is to remain a dominant land power, the security and defense of Army and DoD networks must be viewed as a critical warfighting task.

America’s approach to the threat of global terror has been one dimensional and strategically ineffective.

How can the military best give soldiers an advantage on the future battlefield?

Striking our homeland, the cancer that is ISIS threatens not only our citizens, but threatens our way of life within our own communities as envisioned by country’s...

The hard irreconcilable realities and complexities encountered by NTM-A's mission, and the central role it played in ‘transitioning security to an Afghan lead...

GO-1X represents an incomplete understanding of Islamic cultural values, provides marginal operational utility, persists in multiple conflicting versions, and suffers from...

The addition of the cyber domain begs the question: What about when the human terrain is the Key Terrain and control of it represents the decisive point?

Cyber-crime is a criminal activity that is informational, global, and networked. It is the product of networked technologies that have transformed the division of criminal...

In various domains of security and conflict, analysts increasingly predict that machines will take on progressively larger components of human reasoning and decision-making...

Salik was changing the Afghan Great Game, from the soil up.

The Marines had the fastest rifles in the village of Binh Nghia. It wasn't long until the second fastest belonged to their comrades-in-arms, the Popular Forces.

This may be the sensational media headline in the near future as DOD continues to struggle over the strategy to fight ISIS in Syria.

ISIL's real strength comes from an ability to operate as a decentralized network projecting power on the battlefield and in the information sphere.

This article traces coalition force mentors from their pre-deployment training at Sandhurst, to their deployment at ANAOA and finally to post-deployment.

By looking at institutional shortcomings we can effectively explain why the military has a hard time dealing with complex conflicts and a whole range of other problems.

The most egregious exporters of religious hate and sharia bigotry are putative EU/American “partners;” or allies; i.e. Pakistan, Afghanistan, Arabia, and Persia...

The Peace of Westphalia and its 4 principles for interstate relations isn't failing, it's democracy more specifically that is faltering often because it never took...