Small Wars Journal

Is This the Right Way to End a War?

Is This the Right Way to End a War?  By Rod Nordland – New York Times

Many experts worry that the U.S. is repeating the mistakes of Vietnam in Afghanistan.

 

Afghanistan long ago took from Vietnam the title of America’s longest war, when it passed the 13-year mark in 2014.

 

Five years later, with the recent possibility of a peace deal that would bring another American withdrawal from an unpopular war, comparisons of the two conflicts are once again rife — even among many of the leaders America has sent to Afghanistan in recent years.

 

Ryan Crocker, who was twice America’s top diplomat in Kabul, led the chorus of people sensing déjà vu. “It just reminds me of the Paris peace talks on Vietnam,” Mr. Crocker, now diplomat-in-residence at Princeton, said. “By going to the table, we basically were telling the North Vietnamese and Viet Cong, ‘We surrender, we’re here just to work out the terms.’” …

Read on.

Comments

The proper question here -- although this may seem obvious in the beginning/at first glance -- is:

"Is This the Right Way to End the Old Cold War?

Explanation:

1.  After facing the Afghans in the 1980s, the Soviets would, cir. 1989 and with the rise of Secretary Gorbachev:

a.  Abandon their "revolutionary" stance and identity.  And, thus, would: 

b.  Abandon their revolutionary "raison detre" -- of transforming the outlying states and societies of the world more along communist political, economic, social and value lines. 

(Hereafter, Russia would seek to "mimic" the West and -- by way of these exact such processes and decisions -- communism would lose much of its legitimacy on the world stage.)

Thus, it is exactly at this point-in-time (cir. 1989) that the Soviets would lose their portion of the Old Cold War. 

2.  After facing the Afghans in the 2000s and 2010s, the U.S. would, cir. 2016 and with the election of President Trump:

a.  Abandon our "revolutionary" stance and identity.  And, thus, would:

b.  Abandon our "raison detre" -- of transforming the outling states and societies of the world more along, in our case, modern western political, economic, social and value lines. 

(Hereafter, the U.S. would come to praise the more-authoritarian rulers/regimes of world and -- by way of these exact such processes and decisions -- democracy itself would come to lose much of its legitimacy on the world stage.)  

Thus, it at exactly this point-in-time (cir. 2016), that the U.S. would lose its portion of the Old Cold War also.

Bottom Line Thought -- Based on the Above:

Comparing Vietnam and Afghanistan, in the context that I provide above, this is like comparing apples and organges.

Comparing Afghanistan cir. 1980 with Afghanistan cir 2000s and 2010s -- in the manner that I do above -- this, given the common result (the two competing great powers of the late 20th Century BOTH lose their "revolutionary" stance and identity and, thus, BOTH lose their portion of the Old Cold War); THIS is the comparison that we should be looking to?

(Thus, the quesion becomes:  IS THIS THE RIGHT WAY TO END THE OLD COLD WAR -- TO WIT: BY WAY OF SURRENDER, DEFEAT AND COPITUATION -- AS DESCRIBED ABOVE????????)