Small Wars Journal

How Russian Motorcycle Gangs, Fake News and Cyber Attacks Could Threaten NATO, And How U.S. Forces Can Help

How Russian Motorcycle Gangs, Fake News and Cyber Attacks Could Threaten NATO, And How U.S. Forces Can Help by Kyle Rempfer - Military Times

Ever since Russia annexed Crimea from Ukraine and sponsored separatists in the Donbas, Eastern Europe has collectively wondered: “Where will the Kremlin strike next?”

 

The Baltics are one likely target.

 

Russia could begin a rapid attack under the guise of a snap exercise, combining troops from its western military district with those in its exclave of Kaliningrad. The resulting pincer movement could isolate the Latvian and Estonian capital cities in mere days.

 

However, such a bold assault would quickly trigger Article 5, NATO’s collective defense principle. It’s more likely that the attack would be opaque, muddled through the use of proxy forces, disinformation and cyber attacks.

 

What if a Russian motorcycle gang rolled up to an Estonian border outpost and started “causing a ruckus," proposed Stephen J. Flanagan, a senior political scientist at the Rand Corporation who co-authored a new study on deterring Russian aggression in the Baltics for the Pentagon.

Read on.