The National Interest

The National Interest is an American bi-monthly international affairs magazine published by the Center for the National Interest. It is associated with the realist school of foreign policy thought. It was founded in 1985 by Irving Kristol and until 2001 was edited by Anglo-Australian Owen Harries. The National Interest is not restricted in content to "foreign policy" in the narrow, technical sense but attempts to pay attention to broad ideas and the way in which cultural and social differences, technological innovations, history, and religion impact the behavior of states.

“Good strategies are essential for the priority national-security challenges America faces, whether it is Syria, ISIS, Russia, China, North Korea or Afghanistan.”

"CAS can sometimes be provided from heavy bombers using satellite-guided bombs, but the most effective approach often is to come after the enemy low and slow."

Sean Lavelle, a U.S. Navy Officer, says “The U.S.-European alliance would benefit from specialization”.

“Russia has experienced some successes on the Syrian battlefield, but these victories are far from establishing Moscow as the new power broker in the region.”

"It is Phases IV and V that the United States has recently had more difficulty with, both as a military and as a nation."

“Senior U.S. military leaders, held by many Americans to be above moral reproach, are rapidly becoming indistinguishable from their political counterparts.”