The National Interest

The National Interest is an American bi-monthly international affairs magazine published by the Center for the National Interest. It is associated with the realist school of foreign policy thought. It was founded in 1985 by Irving Kristol and until 2001 was edited by Anglo-Australian Owen Harries. The National Interest is not restricted in content to "foreign policy" in the narrow, technical sense but attempts to pay attention to broad ideas and the way in which cultural and social differences, technological innovations, history, and religion impact the behavior of states.

"The tragic loss of four American fighters in Niger reminds one that the United States has learned little from the wars in Vietnam, Afghanistan and Iraq."

"One presidential trip will not solve these problems, but President Trump can begin to set the stage for a more robust and effective U.S. approach."

“We’ve seen this movie before, and it doesn’t end well.”

“The Kremlin needs a real plan to mitigate the threat of returnee ISIS fighters.”

"Want an intellectually inert U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard? Fine: stifle the free interplay of ideas and views on campus, and within the sea."

"Despite good intentions, the United States should not pursue high-minded objectives that are peripheral to national security."