Charles J. Dunlap, Jr.

Charles J. Dunlap Jr., the former deputy judge advocate general of the United States Air Force, joined the Duke Law faculty in July 2010 where he is a professor of the practice of law and Executive Director of the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security. His teaching and scholarly writing focus on national security, international law, civil-military relations, cyberwar, airpower, counter-insurgency, military justice, and ethical issues related to the practice of national security law.

Dunlap retired from the Air Force in June 2010, having attained the rank of major general during a 34-year career in the Judge Advocate General Corps. In his capacity as deputy judge advocate general from May 2006 to March 2010, he assisted the judge advocate general in the professional supervision of more than 2,200 judge advocates, 350 civilian lawyers, 1,400 enlisted paralegals, and 500 civilians around the world. In addition to overseeing an array of military justice, operational, international, and civil law functions, he provided legal advice to the Air Staff and commanders at all levels.

Does the NATO treaty “automatically” require the U.S. use force to defend a NATO ally?  The short answer is “no”.

Lawyers like to say that “bad facts make bad law” – and that could be at play here.

Few things have been more emblematic of the military and, indeed, political aspects of the Obama War Powers legacy than drones.

Still Shortchanged: Some Observations About the New Army/Marine Corps COIN Doctrine