Mexico

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Journal Article | March 31, 2014 07:22 PM | Comments(1)

Transnational crime and its associated transnational illicit networks pose a challenge to sovereignty and governance by fostering corruption and impunity.

Journal Article | March 22, 2014 03:51 PM | Comments(9)

The “Hidden” Power of Illegally Armed Groups in Latin America: Mexico a Case Study

Journal Article | March 19, 2014 12:18 AM | Comments(1)

This essay is the first in a series exploring the issue of drug-related violence in Mexico.

Mexican Cartel Op-Ed No. 8: Will Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman Loera be tried in Mexico or the United States?

Sinaloa Drug Cartel Can Continue Without 'Chapo' Guzman, Experts Say by Diana Washington Valdez, El Paso Times

Blog post | January 30, 2014 08:33 AM | Comments(1)

Mexico essentially legalized the country’s growing “self-defense” groups while also announcing that security forces had captured one of the four top leaders of the Knights Templar...

Blog post | January 24, 2014 08:27 AM | Comments(1)

Mexican Cartel Strategic Note No. 17: Civil Self-Defense Groups Have Emerged in 11 Mexican States

One fighter claimed to be a US Army veteran who returned to Mexico specifically to join the militias. There were many like him, he said.

Mexican Cartel Strategic Note No. 16: Recent Santa Muerte Spiritual Conflict Trends

Hong Kong Triads Work with Mexican Drug Lords on Methamphetamine by Brian Harris, South China Morning Post.

Blog post | January 14, 2014 03:22 PM | Comments(12)

Mexican security forces sent to quell unrest in the western state of Michoacan have started disarming local vigilante groups, state officials say.

Journal Article | January 13, 2014 05:47 AM | Comments(4)

Part 7 of a series that provides a retrospective look at the first year of Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto’s Sexenio with comments on the prospects for 2014.

Part 6 of a series that provides a retrospective look at the first year of Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto’s Sexenio with comments on the prospects for 2014.

Journal Article | January 10, 2014 08:39 AM | Comments(1)

Part 5 of a series that provides a retrospective look at the first year of Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto’s Sexenio with comments on the prospects for 2014.

Part 4 of a series that provides a retrospective look at the first year of Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto’s Sexenio with comments on the prospects for 2014.

Part 3 of a series that provides a retrospective look at the first year of Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto’s Sexenio with comments on the prospects for 2014.

Part 2 of a series that provides a retrospective look at the first year of Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto’s Sexenio with comments on the prospects for 2014.

Journal Article | January 6, 2014 08:41 AM | Comments(12)

Part 1 of a series that provides a retrospective look at the first year of Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto’s Sexenio with comments on the prospects for 2014.

"An audacious band of citizen militias battles a brutal drug cartel in the hills of central Mexico."

Narco-Politics: How Mexico Got There and How It Can Get Out by Pamela F. Izaguirre, Council on Hemispheric Affairs.

No matter how much the cartels tried, and continue to try, to hide their evil acts with continued threats against journalists, a group of citizens emerged to fill in the gap of local cartel coverage...

Mexico and the US continue to assert that this a war on drugs, but provide no evidence that the drug trade has diminished despite the mounting death toll and the billions of dollars spent.

Associated Press reports "U.S. law enforcement officials expressed outrage over the release from prison of Mexican drug lord Rafael Caro Quintero". AP and news links.

Journal Article | August 7, 2013 04:57 AM | Comments(3)

Attacks against Mexican government officials, law enforcement, and political institutions by drug cartels, fall neatly into the Fourth Generation Warfare paradigm.

Since 2006 exceptionally intense drug-related warfare has plagued Mexico and accumulated a death toll ranging from at least 50,000 to perhaps over 100,000 with an additional 20,000 missing.