Small Wars Journal

Design and the Prospects for Artistry

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Design and the Prospects for Artistry

by Christopher R. Paparone and George L. Topic

Download the Full Article: Design and the Prospects for Artistry

Here, we would like to open a conversation about educating military practitioners, focusing more on the artistry of design (reflective practice) involving the "where," "why," and "how." Through our normative stance (i.e. taking a "should" perspective), we hope the community of educators and senior practitioners are spurred to better appreciate what we argue are the more desirable professional qualities of artistry. To that intent, we admit we argue provocatively rather than seek to ratify the status quo. Our intent is not to suggest current practices in professional military education have no place in the future, but that they must be subordinated to greater scope and methods of design.

Download the Full Article: Design and the Prospects for Artistry

Dr. Christopher R. Paparone is an associate professor in the Army Command and General Staff College's Department of Joint, Interagency, Intergovernmental, and Multinational Operations at Fort Lee, Virginia. He is a retired Army colonel and has a Ph.D. degree from Pennsylvania State University.

Colonel George Topic, USA (Ret.), is the vice director in the Center for Joint and Strategic Logistics at the National Defense University. He served as a Quartermaster officer for 28 years on active duty and for 3 years as the deputy director for strategic logistics on the Joint Staff.

About the Author(s)

Chris Paparone is a retired US Army Colonel who served in various command and staff positions in war and peace in the continental United States, Panama, Saudi Arabia, Germany, and Bosnia.  He is a graduate of the US Naval War College and received his PhD in public administration from The Pennsylvania State University, Harrisburg. He has published numerous articles, book chapters, and in 2013 published a Bloomsbury book titled The Sociology of Military Science: Prospects for Postinstitutional Military Design.  He considers himself a burgeoning "critical military epistemologist" and will feature an article on CME in a forthcoming Journal of Military and Strategic Studies special issue.